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Comic Book PEDIGREES THREAD8583

Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@southerncross

From the My Slabbed Comics site

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NORTHLAND COLLECTION
Known as one of the nicer Silver Age pedigrees due to it's high grades and full runs of titles. The collection came through Motor City Comics in the mid-90's from a gentleman who brought books to them in batches when he needed the money. The collection contained DC, Marvel, Dell, Gold Key, Charlton and there are duplicates of many issues in this pedigree as well.

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@CatmanAmerica has already shown some 'D' copies

from the My Slabbed Comics site

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DAVIS CRIPPEN 'D' COPY PEDIGREE
Numbering 13,000 comic books the Crippen "D" pedigree comes in second only to the Edgar Church/Mile High pedigree for scope of Golden Age collections. Though it lacks many key issues that the Edgar Church/Mile High pedigree has, the Crippen "D" collection holds it's own with it's complete runs of most publishers and genres from 1940-1955. The collection surfaced in two parts. The first batch of approx 2000 comic books appeared in 1991, and may have been stolen from the Crippen residence. The balance of the collection was sold upon the owner Davis Crippens' death 15 years later. The collection is also known for it's quality though there are some foxing/moistures issues that affected many of the books after being moved to an unprotected garage later in Crippen's life.

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I have examples, though they are yet to be slabbed. A search of Heritage Auctions post sale records can verify these books as from the collection.



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From the Comic Book Pedigrees site

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PENNSYLVANIA PEDIGREE
In 1981, while Steve Geppi was building his comic empire, one of his store managers uncovered a lead to a comic collection near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The broker, named Birney, took him to an elderly lady's home where stacks of Golden Age comics were piled throughout a room. The room also happened to contain several children running around, carelessly bumping into the stacks. Steve actually witnessed the Detective #38 and All-Star #8 sustain damage by the kids.

There were about 1,000 comics in the collection, primarily from the 1941-1944 period, and contained mostly superhero comics from just about every company publishing at the time. With a median grade near VF/NM 9.0, the Pennsylvania collection ranks in the top 25%. The bulk of the books have resided in Steve Geppi and Bob Overstreet's personal collections for over a decade before they began leaking into the market.

A few years later Steve learned that there were more books in the collection, possibly held back from the original purchase. Steve bought these as well, using the entire collection as a stepping stone to build Diamond into the #1 distribution company for comics nationwide. And the store manager who uncovered the lead? None other than Al Stoltz, owner of Basement comics and co-owner of the Lost Valley Pedigree.

*****
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Prayers answered, the holy grails of pedigrees collecting is at hand...



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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
From The Comic Book Price Guide site

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EDGAR CHURCH (MILE HIGH)PEDIGREE
Here's what noted comic book historian Pat Kochanek has to say:

"Also known as "The Mile High Collection," the Edgar Church collection is undoubtedly the finest collection of comic books ever found. It amazes me that, in a nation of 100 to 200 million persons, 10 billion comics were purchased between 1935 and 1965, and only one such quality collection was accumulated and safely stored! Before we get into the interesting circumstances surrounding these collections, it is important to note that many of those who found these impressive collections are reluctant to reveal the sources or circumstances for personal reasons. (Perhaps the collector requested anonymity, or perhaps no information was ever even obtained.) Our representations in this chapter are based on the best information we were able to obtain from dozens of interviews and from information circulating between collectors and dealers.

The year was 1977, the place was in the "Mile High Comics" store operated by Chuck Rozanski, Denver, Colorado. He received a call from someone stating he wanted to sell his large accumulation of comic books. Apparently, he had tried other dealers and none were willing to travel to his home to view the collection. Chuck Rozanski was willing to check it out. Reportedly, the seller already had a price in mind, $1800 cash, for 18,000 comic books. After some time had elapsed, and with help from Burrell Rowe, Chuck purchased the collection.

The comics were stored in the basement, which was dry, dark and cooler than the rest of the home. They were located in what appeared to be a large pantry located in the center of the basement. The pantry was approximately 6 ft. by 8 ft. with painted shelves all around the walls. When the Churches opened the door, Chuck was almost floored at the sight of almost a solid wall of comic books stacked to the ceiling. All the shelves were stacked solidly, and there were dozens of neat stacks of comics on the floor. Immediately, he could see that the comic books appeared to have been bought and stacked, without having even been read. Clearly, this would be a good investment of $1800.

In addition to the comic books, there were at least a couple of pallets filled with cut-up pulps, magazines of all kinds, advertising samples, calendars, artwork by Edgar Church, and other dissected printed matter. Apparently Edgar Church was a commercial artist and purchased all the newsstand materials in order to aid him in his commercial endeavors. Most of his work was for advertising and he appeared to be best at illus-trating with designs and lettering. He seemed to have some difficulty with drawing human figures. It was perhaps his desire to improve his cartooning skill that had prompted the accumulation of all the comic books, for a future time when he could develop that market for his work. Perhaps he was ready to start cutting up the comics as he did with all the other magazines!!!

Much of the cut-up pulps and magazines were from the 1920s and 1930s. The comics seemed to come later in his already developed career as commercial artist. He purchased virtually every "serious" comic book from 1939 to 1953. He generally did not purchase the "funny" books, like the Dell Publishing comics, or funny animal character comics. Once he got started buying fresh from his supplier, likely a corner store, he went to a used magazine store, "The Reader's Guild," on 14th Street, Denver. There he could buy once or twice read comics from the previous couple of years for only 5¢ to 8¢ each. These copies were sometimes marked with double pencil slashes in the upper left corner, or by the new price marked in pencil.

However, the large majority of his collection was bought from a single source. All the distributor markings are similar, generally a "D" with the arrival date on the left of the cover and a number on the right indicating how many comics were stocked by the distributor, usually 4 to 8 (certainly an indication of the popularity of certain comics in Denver at that time).

The small, suburban, boxlike, with a brick front porch and stairs leading down to the sidewalk was Edgar Church's home when he collected and stored this fabulous collection. Some of the comics he acquired were subscription copies and thus gave this street address.

The details concerning why Edgar Church stopped collecting, why the family sold the collection, or when he passed away are unclear. We intend to respect his personal privacy. While it is known that the last authentic copies from his collection were from 1953/1954, many of the copies from the 1950s do not have identifying marks, and they are not of the same superb quality".

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The Mile High/Church collection is revered as THE Pedigrees of Pedigrees.
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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
While as a primarily Golden Age collector these days I would LOVE to own more Church copies, currently only one resides in my collection. However, I am in negotiations on two examples and may have a thing or two report before/by years end here. But for now.....
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I happen to be sending books in for reholder and a few are pedigrees.






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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by the420bandito

Mic drop!
WOW WOW and WOW!! Love me some Aces, but a Church copy to boot!
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Captain Accident the420bandito private msg quote post Address this user
I love me some date/store stamps on my pedigrees. Bethlehem peds are great since they usually have both. Bethlehem, PA is also kind of close to me so there you have it.





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Something interesting regarding the Mile High Pedigree story: the text says that the collection did not contain funny animal comics,etc. I think this may be questionable information because I specifically remember reading an interview with Chuck, where he stated that the animal comics were the first things he sold out of the collection because he already had a buyer for those books before he even purchased the collection. Where I read this I can’t recall as it was likely years ago, but I am sure that is what was said. It is very likely that Church copies of the funny animal books do exist. Undiscovered Mile Highs. How about that?😮
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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelekrupp
Something interesting regarding the Mile High Pedigree story: the text says that the collection did not contain funny animal comics,etc. I think this may be questionable information because I specifically remember reading an interview with Chuck, where he stated that the animal comics were the first things he sold out of the collection because he already had a buyer for those books before he even purchased the collection. Where I read this I can’t recall as it was likely years ago, but I am sure that is what was said. It is very likely that Church copies of the funny animal books do exist. Undiscovered Mile Highs. How about that?😮
This has been discussed "across the street" at great length too. Some theories are these may have been thrown away (maybe Chuck didnt want them?).
Any way I do recall Heritage Auction recently selling some Looney Tunes related Church copy Dell's.
@CatmanAmerica I'm sure is way more versed in what may or may have not been in the collection than I am. Hopefully he will chime in
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Please continue to ignore anything I post. southerncross private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
@Darkseid_of_town

From the My Slabbed Comics site

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WHITE MOUNTAIN COLLECTION
Sold in pieces as early 1984 this collection came to prominence at Sotheby's comic auctions in the early 1990s. The collection consists of full runs of 1950s (mostly horror and science fiction) and early Silver Age comics that are known for their high grade condition and stunning white page quality due to being stored ina cool, dry environment. Later issues are often identified by pen markings near issue number as well as date stamp or date written on 1st page.

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If I recall correctly the collector was not a big fan of superhero comics so this genre was just collected not read.
Also in the early 90s the white mountain copy of Amazing Fantasy 15 was sold at auction and set a price of $40k. Amazing at the time for pre 3rd party grading and the Over street price of AF 15 in near mint at the time was $18k

Here are 2 White mountains





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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@southerncross Beautiful books sir! Those blues!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelekrupp
Something interesting regarding the Mile High Pedigree story: the text says that the collection did not contain funny animal comics,etc. I think this may be questionable information because I specifically remember reading an interview with Chuck, where he stated that the animal comics were the first things he sold out of the collection because he already had a buyer for those books before he even purchased the collection. Where I read this I can’t recall as it was likely years ago, but I am sure that is what was said. It is very likely that Church copies of the funny animal books do exist. Undiscovered Mile Highs. How about that?😮
This has been discussed "across the street" at great length too. Some theories are these may have been thrown away (maybe Chuck didnt want them?).
Any way I do recall Heritage Auction recently selling some Looney Tunes related Church copy Dell's.
@CatmanAmerica I'm sure is way more versed in what may or may have not been in the collection than I am. Hopefully he will chime in


There are still some mysteries about the Edgar Church collection fueled by rumors and confusion over how the books were initially split up among those who helped Chuck Rozanski finance the purchase. Unless I'm mistaken part of the collection (WDC&S, Dells and other funny animal titles) was snapped up by one of Chuck's partners early on while acquiring the collection. There are some funny animal books listed in one Church master-list, but I'm not sure how much credibility to give the source since the data is incomplete and some entries are incorrect as to grade. Here's the link for reference, but I'd advise taking the info provided with a very large grain of salt:

clickable text
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Leftover Sundae Gnus CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Now for a Larson pedigree ...


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...or two!


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Collector roasty private msg quote post Address this user
I've got over a dozen mile high in my new collection (still going through the collection). All are CBCS graded. Checking the CGC database, 5 of mine would be the highest graded. Such as an Adventure Comics #91 at 9.6 and #113 at a 9.8 grade. On the Featured page. https://www.cbcscomics.com/featured
Actually all of the ones Sensation 13 thru Action 129 are mine.
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Collector MR_SigS private msg quote post Address this user
I found this with a purchase some years back.




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FWIW this is the Mile High list I always refer to. http://www.milehighcomics.com/catalog/main.html
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Collector michaelekrupp private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelekrupp
Something interesting regarding the Mile High Pedigree story: the text says that the collection did not contain funny animal comics,etc. I think this may be questionable information because I specifically remember reading an interview with Chuck, where he stated that the animal comics were the first things he sold out of the collection because he already had a buyer for those books before he even purchased the collection. Where I read this I can’t recall as it was likely years ago, but I am sure that is what was said. It is very likely that Church copies of the funny animal books do exist. Undiscovered Mile Highs. How about that?😮
This has been discussed "across the street" at great length too. Some theories are these may have been thrown away (maybe Chuck didnt want them?).
Any way I do recall Heritage Auction recently selling some Looney Tunes related Church copy Dell's.
@CatmanAmerica I'm sure is way more versed in what may or may have not been in the collection than I am. Hopefully he will chime in


There are still some mysteries about the Edgar Church collection fueled by rumors and confusion over how the books were initially split up among those who helped Chuck Rozanski finance the purchase. Unless I'm mistaken part of the collection (WDC&S, Dells and other funny animal titles) was snapped up by one of Chuck's partners early on while acquiring the collection. There are some funny animal books listed in one Church master-list, but I'm not sure how much credibility to give the source since the data is incomplete and some entries are incorrect as to grade. Here's the link for reference, but I'd advise taking the info provided with a very large grain of salt:

clickable text
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What you are saying here seems to corroborate what Chuck said in that interview years ago, that there were animal comics and they were snapped up immediately, which would explain why they may not have made the inventory lists.
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Collector michaelekrupp private msg quote post Address this user
@the420bandito Viewing that list sure makes me wish I had a shot at those books back in ‘77! Unfortunately I was turning 8 that year😕. If I could just get that darn time machine working...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the420bandito
FWIW this is the Mile High list I always refer to. http://www.milehighcomics.com/catalog/main.html


I used to have a copy of that oversized folded tabloid newsprint catalog. It came as a two section inclusion with Alan Light's Buyer's Guide for Comic Fandom. My first Edgar Church books were purchased directly from Chuck Rozanski (Mile High). The tabloid catalog was sporadically illustrated with butterfly-winged fairies (illustrated by Don Newton, as I recall). Clicking through the pages, this version looks stripped down, without the illustrations from the original Buyer's Guide insert.

Unfortunately, my copy of this historic catalog has either been misplaced or thrown out by mistake while moving long ago. But what stands out in my mind is the consistent methodology employed in pricing books. Everything was priced at precisely twice the current OSG value established for specified grades the year the catalog came out. To simplify grading everything in the mint range was simply NM+ with lesser conditions noted as VF, Fine, etc.; there was no 10 point system used to breakdown grades in '77.
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