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Comic Book PEDIGREES THREAD8583

Collector MR_SigS private msg quote post Address this user
I found this with a purchase some years back.




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Collector the420bandito private msg quote post Address this user
FWIW this is the Mile High list I always refer to. http://www.milehighcomics.com/catalog/main.html
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Collector michaelekrupp private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelekrupp
Something interesting regarding the Mile High Pedigree story: the text says that the collection did not contain funny animal comics,etc. I think this may be questionable information because I specifically remember reading an interview with Chuck, where he stated that the animal comics were the first things he sold out of the collection because he already had a buyer for those books before he even purchased the collection. Where I read this I canโ€™t recall as it was likely years ago, but I am sure that is what was said. It is very likely that Church copies of the funny animal books do exist. Undiscovered Mile Highs. How about that?๐Ÿ˜ฎ
This has been discussed "across the street" at great length too. Some theories are these may have been thrown away (maybe Chuck didnt want them?).
Any way I do recall Heritage Auction recently selling some Looney Tunes related Church copy Dell's.
@CatmanAmerica I'm sure is way more versed in what may or may have not been in the collection than I am. Hopefully he will chime in


There are still some mysteries about the Edgar Church collection fueled by rumors and confusion over how the books were initially split up among those who helped Chuck Rozanski finance the purchase. Unless I'm mistaken part of the collection (WDC&S, Dells and other funny animal titles) was snapped up by one of Chuck's partners early on while acquiring the collection. There are some funny animal books listed in one Church master-list, but I'm not sure how much credibility to give the source since the data is incomplete and some entries are incorrect as to grade. Here's the link for reference, but I'd advise taking the info provided with a very large grain of salt:

clickable text
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What you are saying here seems to corroborate what Chuck said in that interview years ago, that there were animal comics and they were snapped up immediately, which would explain why they may not have made the inventory lists.
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Collector michaelekrupp private msg quote post Address this user
@the420bandito Viewing that list sure makes me wish I had a shot at those books back in โ€˜77! Unfortunately I was turning 8 that year๐Ÿ˜•. If I could just get that darn time machine working...
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Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by the420bandito
FWIW this is the Mile High list I always refer to. http://www.milehighcomics.com/catalog/main.html


I used to have a copy of that oversized folded tabloid newsprint catalog. It came as a two section inclusion with Alan Light's Buyer's Guide for Comic Fandom. My first Edgar Church books were purchased directly from Chuck Rozanski (Mile High). The tabloid catalog was sporadically illustrated with butterfly-winged fairies (illustrated by Don Newton, as I recall). Clicking through the pages, this version looks stripped down, without the illustrations from the original Buyer's Guide insert.

Unfortunately, my copy of this historic catalog has either been misplaced or thrown out by mistake while moving long ago. But what stands out in my mind is the consistent methodology employed in pricing books. Everything was priced at precisely twice the current OSG value established for specified grades the year the catalog came out. To simplify grading everything in the mint range was simply NM+ with lesser conditions noted as VF, Fine, etc.; there was no 10 point system used to breakdown grades in '77.
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Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Recil Macon pedigree...



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Collector southerncross private msg quote post Address this user
Here are 2 Crowley copies.
Crime does not pay 25 and though not a classic cover by collectors. A classic cover for me as it's a classic cold war cover. Bill battle 3




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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Have a few more to catch up on after what's been posted recently, but two more Ped back stories for now:

@southerncross from the My Slabbed Comics site

*****

CROWLEY PEDIGREE
Publisher William Crowley socked away 1-3 copies of nearly every Fawcett comic book that was released during his tenure as editor at Fawcett in the 1940s to the 50s, as well as many non-Fawcett titles such as Batman, Superman and Timely titles. With itโ€™s many high grade copies it stands second only to the Edgar Church/Mile High collection for the quantity of graded comics!

*****
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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
From the Comic Book Pedigrees site

*****

LARSON PEDIGREE
To anyone familiar with comic book pedigrees, the Lamont Larson collection needs no introduction. One of the earliest and most prodigious of the pedigrees, the Larsons were among the first recognized as such in the hobby. The books within the collection represent the rarest part of the Golden Age, and many copies are the best in existence. But what made Larson comics so famous was their mystique. Despite having his name emblazoned across many of the prettiest comics in the hobby, not a soul knew who Lamont Larson was. Even Ernie Gerber put a plea in his photo-journals: "Lamont, if you are reading this please give me a call: I'd sure like to know more about how you accumulated this historic collection." The mystery continued for 20 years, until one dogged collector took matter into his own hands...

One of the great things about the Larson collection is the depth of rarity. The genesis was 1936, a mere three years after comics began in their current form. It contains many of the toughest comics known today, and ranks third in scarcity. For several years, those familiar with the books have suggested they rank as the third best Golden Age pedigree overall. The many key issues that are present certainly support such a notion; only three of these 45 pedigreed collections contain an Action #1, and Larson is one of them.

*****

Uber collector Jon Berk famously tracked down Lamont in his later years, and when he sold off most of his collection in 2017, i had to make sure i got a Centaur comic example and a Larson copy from the collection since Berk had become so 'linked' with both in fandom lore.
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Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
This is a great opportunity to slip in my sole book from the Jon Berk collection (sneaky person that I am). Prize Comics #20 is so rare that a copy couldn't be located when Ernie Gerber published his Photo-Journal Guides back in the mid-90's (linked image below). Currently there are only four graded copies. While technically not a pedigree, the Berk collection acknowledgement is as deserving of mention as File copies. Given it's scarcity and meticulously detailed Jack Binder cover art, this book is truly a prize...




clickable text

PS: BIG tankard toast to Sagii for adding background pedigree information!
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Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Next up, the Billy Wright pedigree...


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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
This is a great opportunity to slip in my sole book from the Jon Berk collection (sneaky person that I am). Prize Comics #20 is so rare that a copy couldn't be located when Ernie Gerber published his Photo-Journal Guides back in the mid-90's (linked image below). Currently there are only four graded copies. While technically not a pedigree, the Berk collection acknowledgement is as deserving of mention as File copies. Given it's scarcity and meticulously detailed Jack Binder cover art, this book is truly a prize...




clickable text

PS: BIG tankard toast to Sagii for adding background pedigree information!
Love the fact that CBCS recognized CGC's notation of the collection on their label. You certainly have the most unique slabbed Berk copy ๐Ÿ˜
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Collector michaelekrupp private msg quote post Address this user
Leading Comics 10, Crowley copy.
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Collector michaelekrupp private msg quote post Address this user
While not an original owner collection and therefore not qualified to be a pedigree collection, there seem to be a lot of nice Mister Magik Woo books out there. Any background info on this collection?
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Collector southerncross private msg quote post Address this user
Some more Pacific coast



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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@the420bandito @southerncross Nice books! Just outstanding examples!

From the My Slabbed Comics site

*****

PACIFIC COAST PEDIGREE
Widely regarded as one of the nicest collection of Silver Age comics, the Pacific Coast collection consists of several thousand comics ranging from 1962-1967. The original owner chose near perfect examples of available copies from the same newstand for years and stored the comics in six foot high stacks, thus preserving the unread look of the comics. Years later the collection started to appear on ebay. Robert Roter, owner of the Pacific Comic Exchange(and hence the Pedigree name) bought the balance of the collection in 1999. There many high grade runs of Marvels, DC, Gold Key, ACG and Mad Magazines in the collection which continues to set the Silver Age benchmark for quality.

*****
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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@michaelekrupp

From Heritage Auctions Magazine "The Intelligent Collector"

*****

MR. MAGIK WOO COLLECTION
Who is Mister Magik Woo?
Quite simply, Mr. Woo is a former hiphop dancer who had the foresight in the late
1980s to collect the best-graded copies of
his favorite titles.
His comics are so remarkable that Comic
Book Certification Service (CBCS) includes
his name on their Woo-graded comics โ€“
โ€œFrom the Personal Collection of Mister
Magik Woo.โ€
In all, Woo estimates about 650 slabs
are labeled as Woo comics โ€“ something
typically reserved for pedigrees, not
collectors. Many represent the highestgraded example for the encased comics โ€“
with an eclectic range of titles (from Astro
Boy and Captain America Comics to Little
Lotta and Wonder Woman) representing
publishers such as Harvey, Dell, DC and
Marvel. Since 2015, Woo books have
realized more than $330,000 at auction.
โ€œMagikโ€™s books are known for their
eye-appeal,โ€ says Barry Sandoval, director
of operations for comics and comic art at
Heritage Auctions.

*****

The most famous book from this collection was the Pennsylvania pedigree copy of 'Suspense Comics #3'(CBCS 9.0)which fetched $173,275.00 at auction. Here's my book from the collection.



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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
From the Hotchkiss site

*****

JON BERK COLLECTION
Jon Berk likes to say that the obsession began during his lower-mid year at Hotchkiss, when he would spend Saturday afternoons sprawled on the floor of John Titcomb and Jeff Wenk's double on the second floor of Coy, engrossed in the escapades of Sgt. Fury and the Fantastic Four. At home in Roslyn, Long Island, comicbooks (Berk insists that "comicbook" is one word, not two, as it's commonly written) were forbidden; his parents threw out his collection while he was at camp the summer before he came to Hotchkiss. But that didn't stop him from sneaking the occasional copy of Batman or The Amazing Spider-man from the local five and dime โ€” and, over the course of his life, amassing what's widely regarded by prominent enthusiasts and appraisers as one of the best collections of all time. Quips Berk: "If it weren't for parents like mine who threw out all those books, they wouldn't be the prized collectables they are today."

Berk, an attorney in Rocky Hill, CT, first became serious about collecting while he was in law school at Boston University. He lived near Boston Square, which had a comicbook store that sold hard-to-find vintage editions. When he saw that he could get his hands on these rare comics, he was hooked.

"I'm a geek," he says matter-of-factly. "I was always interested in the things that were obtuse and not well-known."

Berk was a serial collector: he'd start with one superhero, like Spiderman or the Hulk, and find everything he could within a particular era, then move on to another character. Part of the excitement, he says, was tracking down the books โ€” which, in the pre-Internet age, required a considerable amount of sleuthing.

"I wrote a lot of letters," he says. "People would advertise in the comicbook buyer's guide, and you'd write. You didn't know what they looked like. I didn't even know what the covers looked like. You found books by luck. You networked, went to conventions."

Berk wasn't only interested in the books; he was also fascinated by the stories behind them. About 15 years ago, he came across a copy of Mystery Men that held a clue to its previous owner: a coupon slipped between its pages with the name "Lamont Larson," a renowned collector, sketched on it in pencil. Determined to find out whether the book had once belonged to Larson, Berk embarked on a fact-finding mission that concluded with a call to Larson's 91-year old mother in a nursing home in Wausa, NE, eventually confirming that the book was, indeed, a Larson original. (Says Berk: "She was very nice!" Gradually, his collection morphed into a mini-museum, consisting of nearly 18,000 books, pieces of art, and other memorabilia, that took over his entire basement. According to Vincent Zurzolo, co-founder of Metropolis Comics, Berk's collection is unmatched in its breadth and depth.

"Between the comic books and the art, this is one of the best collections ever assembled," Zurzolo said in an interview. "We had to process this to put it into our database, and often, when we entered a book, it was the first one we'd ever had. Metropolis Collectibles has been the largest buyer of vintage comics in the world for over 30-40 years โ€” so we've had pretty much everything. When I'm seeing 'Does not exist in database' over and over again, I know we have a very, very special collection."

For decades, Berk thought he'd hold on to his comics forever, but at some point, he realized that he'd reached the pinnacle.

"It was time to pass on the hobby," he says.

Last June, Berk divested himself of most of his collection, selling off more than 17,000 items in a four-day auction. He won't get into what the pieces sold for, but one source that tracks vintage comic sales reports that a 1940 copy of Fantastic Comics #3 fetched $243,000. The few pieces Berk can't bear to part with are some of his personal favorites: the Larson copy of Mystery Men, some Spider-man illustrations by Jack Kirby, and original drawings by Lou Fine, Berk's favorite comicbook artist. Now, he seems at peace with his decision to downsize, but some days, the sight of his near-empty basement makes him sad.

"But I don't have any regrets," he says. "I simply redistributed some of the books, so they're out there for someone else to collect and assemble."

Old habits die hard, though: "Have I since accumulated a few inexpensive comics? Well, yeah."

*****

This story appeared in the fall 2017 issue of Hotchkiss Magazine.


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Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Here's some Rockford pedigree (ummm, not Rockford File copies though)...


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