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Comics Pedigrees

Pedigree - Who/What Decides4706

Collector MarcJ private msg quote post Address this user
For pedigrees, who or what decides what is considered an "official" pedigree? Or is there even such a thing as an official pedigree?

For example, I wouldn't consider just any collection "The xxxx Pedigree".
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Collector ComicHaulics private msg quote post Address this user

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Collector Dick_Pontoon private msg quote post Address this user
Comic Book Pedigrees.
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Collector MarcJ private msg quote post Address this user
@Dick_Pontoon awesome! Thanks for the link.
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Collector no1lufcfan private msg quote post Address this user
@Dick_Pontoon yes nice link 👍
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COLLECTOR drchaos private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick_Pontoon
Comic Book Pedigrees.


Thanks for the link!
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Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcJ
For pedigrees, who or what decides what is considered an "official" pedigree? Or is there even such a thing as an official pedigree?

For example, I wouldn't consider just any collection "The xxxx Pedigree".

A lot of the pedigrees were established by the comic collectors before the cgc or CBCS came along... Curator, Northland, Big Apple, and Church just to name a few.
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Collector BLBcomics private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick_Pontoon
Comic Book Pedigrees.


The Tom Reilly listing therein is bogus b*llsh*t - pure and simple.

There never has been an estimate as high as 5000 books.

There were a bit over 4000 books broken into equal copy count by three sets of relatives. The first portion showed up at the Berkeleycon 73 we hosted on the UC-Berkeley campus. The second batch a few weeks later walked in to out store on Telegraph Ave in May 1973. The 3rd batch came in a month after that as that 3rd set of relatives lived on the east coast.

We began getting the Reilly comics in April 73, then May, then June. Within a few months we used that money to open a San Francisco store in June 1973, then a San Jose store in August, then a Sacramento store in Sept 1973. Thus was born Comics and Comix.

Any so-called "experts" either at CGC and/or CBCS regarding the Reilly books don't know what they are talking about. MOST of the Reilly copies have ZERO markings on them.

The Reilly Whiz 2 (#1)I sold to Burrell Rowe was the very first comic book to sell for $2000. The Reilly Detective 27 I sold Burrell a couple weeks later for 2200 was the very first comic book to break the two grand barrier garnering nationwide AP/UPI newspaper coverage.

Neither had any markings what so ever.

Again, that "Pedigree" site is bogus.


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Collector OrbitCityComics private msg quote post Address this user
Basically, a lot of it boils down to CGC recognizing it as such. I'm curious to see what, if anything, becomes of the modern age.

The current age has a ton of unread comics, and not sure if it's possible to prove single ownership of any given set of moderns.
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Collector BLBcomics private msg quote post Address this user
"pedigree" is over hyped marketing non-sense.
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
The owners were restricted to a diet of Alpo and they must have evidence that they took their heart worm medicine.
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CBCS West_S private msg quote post Address this user
Occasionally, new collections are discovered that are worthy of being designated as a pedigree collection. Listed below are some aspects that help determine whether or not a new collection can be considered for pedigree status for CBCS.

The collection must be from one source. Typically, pedigree collections are accumulated by an original comic book purchaser who bought them off the newsstand when the comics were first published. A collection cannot be a pedigree if the comics were acquired from buying back issues from dealers and assembled in that fashion.

The comic books must be vintage. The first named pedigree collections were all Golden Age books (Comics dating 1930’s -1950’s). In the 1990’s the hobby started to recognize comic books from the 1960’s could also attain pedigree status as the marketplace accepted these newly discovered collections as pedigrees. Today, a comic book collection that has comics from the 1970’s can be considered for pedigree status, but the collection must also contain comic books from the 1960’s or earlier as well.

The comics must be in high grade. There are a lot of collections discovered that are old and from an original source, but equally important is condition. A vast majority of the comics must be in high grade for it to be considered a pedigree. Also, the comics must also have a high state of preservation, meaning books must be fresh with above average paper quality. Collections with significant tanning or brittle pages will not be considered for pedigree status.

Finally, the collection must have a certain amount of books in the collection. Collections of 20 books would not be enough. Often, pedigree collections will have 1,000 to 10,000 or more comics. Some smaller collections have surfaced that were pedigree worthy, but those collections generally consisted of key issues and #1 issues.
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Collector martymann private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by West_S
Occasionally, new collections are discovered that are worthy of being designated as a pedigree collection. Listed below are some aspects that help determine whether or not a new collection can be considered for pedigree status for CBCS.

The collection must be from one source. Typically, pedigree collections are accumulated by an original comic book purchaser who bought them off the newsstand when the comics were first published. A collection cannot be a pedigree if the comics were acquired from buying back issues from dealers and assembled in that fashion.

The comic books must be vintage. The first named pedigree collections were all Golden Age books (Comics dating 1930’s -1950’s). In the 1990’s the hobby started to recognize comic books from the 1960’s could also attain pedigree status as the marketplace accepted these newly discovered collections as pedigrees. Today, a comic book collection that has comics from the 1970’s can be considered for pedigree status, but the collection must also contain comic books from the 1960’s or earlier as well.

The comics must be in high grade. There are a lot of collections discovered that are old and from an original source, but equally important is condition. A vast majority of the comics must be in high grade for it to be considered a pedigree. Also, the comics must also have a high state of preservation, meaning books must be fresh with above average paper quality. Collections with significant tanning or brittle pages will not be considered for pedigree status.

Finally, the collection must have a certain amount of books in the collection. Collections of 20 books would not be enough. Often, pedigree collections will have 1,000 to 10,000 or more comics. Some smaller collections have surfaced that were pedigree worthy, but those collections generally consisted of key issues and #1 issues.


EXCELLENT EXPLANATION! Exactly what I have been told by both CGC
and CBCS when asking about my Collection.

Marty Mann
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Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user

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Collector OrbitCityComics private msg quote post Address this user
Basically, a lot of it boils down to CGC recognizing it as such. I'm curious to see what, if anything, becomes of the modern age.

The current age has a ton of unread comics, and not sure if it's possible to prove single ownership of any given set of moderns.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BLBcomics
"pedigree" is over hyped marketing non-sense.


I agree about the marketing hype.

I do see the value in recognizing such collections and the pride it can give a collector.

It's one thing to pay extra for a book when it's from a creators personal collection AND it's a book they worked on. But I refuse to pay extra for a book of X condition just because it was part of a intact collection that was part of some collector that I have no connection with.
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Collector Logan510 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrbitCityComics
Basically, a lot of it boils down to CGC recognizing it as such. I'm curious to see what, if anything, becomes of the modern age.

The current age has a ton of unread comics, and not sure if it's possible to prove single ownership of any given set of moderns.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BLBcomics
"pedigree" is over hyped marketing non-sense.


I agree about the marketing hype.

I do see the value in recognizing such collections and the pride it can give a collector.

It's one thing to pay extra for a book when it's from a creators personal collection AND it's a book they worked on. But I refuse to pay extra for a book of X condition just because it was part of a intact collection that was part of some collector that I have no connection with.


People pay premiums for all sorts of things in comics. We have several people here who will pay extra for a newsstand edition because of perceived "scarcity", some people will pay extra for books with the Mark Jewelers insert. Personally I think it's silly when people pay hundreds / thousands for a modern variant AKA manufactured collectible. It is what it is.
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COLLECTOR Towmater private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrbitCityComics
Basically, a lot of it boils down to CGC recognizing it as such. I'm curious to see what, if anything, becomes of the modern age.

The current age has a ton of unread comics, and not sure if it's possible to prove single ownership of any given set of moderns.


What is someone had a chain of receipts from Midtown that showed them all being purchased?
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Collector OrbitCityComics private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Towmater
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrbitCityComics
Basically, a lot of it boils down to CGC recognizing it as such. I'm curious to see what, if anything, becomes of the modern age.

The current age has a ton of unread comics, and not sure if it's possible to prove single ownership of any given set of moderns.


What is someone had a chain of receipts from Midtown that showed them all being purchased?


With the availability of moderns, and people buying multiples of a single book, I think it would still be a bit of a challenge to get people who decide these things to trust a person's word.
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COLLECTOR shrewbeer private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by martymann
Quote:
Originally Posted by West_S
Occasionally, new collections are discovered that are worthy of being designated as a pedigree collection. Listed below are some aspects that help determine whether or not a new collection can be considered for pedigree status for CBCS.

The collection must be from one source. Typically, pedigree collections are accumulated by an original comic book purchaser who bought them off the newsstand when the comics were first published. A collection cannot be a pedigree if the comics were acquired from buying back issues from dealers and assembled in that fashion.

The comic books must be vintage. The first named pedigree collections were all Golden Age books (Comics dating 1930’s -1950’s). In the 1990’s the hobby started to recognize comic books from the 1960’s could also attain pedigree status as the marketplace accepted these newly discovered collections as pedigrees. Today, a comic book collection that has comics from the 1970’s can be considered for pedigree status, but the collection must also contain comic books from the 1960’s or earlier as well.

The comics must be in high grade. There are a lot of collections discovered that are old and from an original source, but equally important is condition. A vast majority of the comics must be in high grade for it to be considered a pedigree. Also, the comics must also have a high state of preservation, meaning books must be fresh with above average paper quality. Collections with significant tanning or brittle pages will not be considered for pedigree status.

Finally, the collection must have a certain amount of books in the collection. Collections of 20 books would not be enough. Often, pedigree collections will have 1,000 to 10,000 or more comics. Some smaller collections have surfaced that were pedigree worthy, but those collections generally consisted of key issues and #1 issues.


EXCELLENT EXPLANATION! Exactly what I have been told by both CGC
and CBCS when asking about my Collection.

Marty Mann


A bit towards BOb's point, we really dont NEED the grading companies for a pedigree. They existed before them, and can continue to do so without.

The problem with pedigrees, is authentication. Once that raw book changes hands a few times, or gets de-slabbed... see ya. 'tis a good reason not to pay high premiums for ped books.

There are a few pedigrees (and non-"recognized" pedigrees) that I would pay a premium for; but thats just because I want them for ME.
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Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLBcomics
"pedigree" is over hyped marketing non-sense.

Unless you're selling it.
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
... or shoveling it.
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Collector Homer private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLBcomics
"pedigree" is over hyped marketing non-sense.


You just posted on Ebay a Crack comics 37 self graded 8.5 at 400% of guide, you listed it as the Tom Reilly High Grade.
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Collector OrbitCityComics private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Homer
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLBcomics
"pedigree" is over hyped marketing non-sense.


You just posted on Ebay a Crack comics 37 self graded 8.5 at 400% of guide, you listed it as the Tom Reilly High Grade.


Just because it's hype doesn't mean people capitalise on an opportunity.

I don't think a Ferrari is worth half a mil, but if one fell into my lap I would sell it for every nickel I could get.
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