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CBCS Original Art Program OAP

OA Collectors - thoughts on this please9647

Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
So, I've had this idea rolling around in my head for about a year now, give or take a few months. I've finally decided to throw it out there for thoughts from other collectors. This is specific for people who collect original, published art pages and covers.

I'd like to see a label program for published original art. I'm thinking that CBCS could create a label holder that would attach to, and seal, a toploader. The label would contain the comic title. issue, and date. Then it would just list the penciller and inker (if applicable). But it also would have the page number, any issue notes and things specific to that page. For example, it could list the characters on the page, type of medium (pencil, ink, watercolor, etc) and any other information on the side. Plus, you could expand this for witnessed and verified signatures.

I don't know if it'd be cost efficient, but what do you think of the idea in general?

Here is a quick mock-up that I did.

edit: looking at this, I would have media type listed where "White" is on my sample. I'm thinking purely a label program, no grading involved. So, in my sample, it would say "Inked" instead of "White".


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Collector KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
Love the idea but won't size be an issue?
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Collector JustThatGuy private msg quote post Address this user
@KatKomics maybe he’s trying to tell us about the magazine-size slab they are working on.


But I do like the idea of slabbing OA with a bit of authenticity. I have two 12x16 done by Barry Kitson that are from CGC. Not graded, just who did what.
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
@KatKomics That's why I said it may not be cost efficient. The size might be too big a hurdle. But by using toploaders, weight should not be an issue. I haven't studied the cost side of it yet. But people get posters slabbed, so why not an art page.

@JustThatGuy LOL!!! I have no insider knowledge on that one!!!!!

Here is the mock-up with the "Inked".


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The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
This would add to the complexity, but if it could be created with 2 slots. 1 for original art. 1 for the finished work next to it
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The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user



Like this.

However, giving it more thought, the complexity would make it prohibitive
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Collector Siggy private msg quote post Address this user
MR-SigS here (My original acct is in limbo because of submission snafu- Working on it).
I think this would appeal more to the casual art collector. If all my art were in top loaders, they'd take up a lot more space, and might be a pain to access. Having them in portfolios makes it so easy to enjoy. I don't think I'd be as motivated to plop a heavy[er] stack of loaders on my lap.
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siggy
MR-SigS here (My original acct is in limbo because of submission snafu- Working on it).
I think this would appeal more to the casual art collector. If all my art were in top loaders, they'd take up a lot more space, and might be a pain to access. Having them in portfolios makes it so easy to enjoy. I don't think I'd be as motivated to plop a heavy[er] stack of loaders on my lap.


Great point!!!!
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Collector Nuffsaid111 private msg quote post Address this user
I collect OA but would not use this service. Just being straightforward.
If one is buying a page of OA and one doesn't know who pencilled/inked or what issue the page is from then I'm not sure what one is doing in the OA hobby.

The only tiny remaining piece of the value of a service such as this would be for displaying purposes. And a portfolio suffices for me and I'd venture to guess most OA collectors. If it's a special splash page or comic cover, then framing with special sun prevention glass is ideal for displaying.
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuffsaid111
I collect OA but would not use this service. Just being straightforward.
If one is buying a page of OA and one doesn't know who pencilled/inked or what issue the page is from then I'm not sure what one is doing in the OA hobby.

The only tiny remaining piece of the value of a service such as this would be for displaying purposes. And a portfolio suffices for me and I'd venture to guess most OA collectors. If it's a special splash page or comic cover, then framing with special sun prevention glass is ideal for displaying.


All very good points!!! Thanks!
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Art sizes vary widely. I don't think it's possible to come up with a solution that will work with all pieces of art. I also agree with @Nuffsaid111 .
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
I appreciate the feedback guys!!! I obviously did not think this all the way through!!!
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Collector Batman79 private msg quote post Address this user
Love the idea! Looking forward to see if this turns into something!
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Collector Siggy private msg quote post Address this user
Outlier! LOL
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Collector Siggy private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuffsaid111
If one is buying a page of OA and one doesn't know who pencilled/inked or what issue the page is from then I'm not sure what one is doing in the OA hobby.


I get what you're saying, but appreciation for art [usually] begins with the viewing of it, not after learning who did it. I have at least 2 pages I purchased because of the art alone, and still haven't memorized the artist[s] on one of them.
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Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse_O



I really like the look of this! Well done!!
Post 16 IP   flag post
Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
Well, after eating supper and thinking about what has been said so far, I have a few thoughts.

First, maybe this is just for the "casual" collector. Not everybody buys OA for the same reason. I guess I'd fall into that category. I have about a dozen pages and one cover.

Second, the idea of any label is to convey information. It isn't necessarily just for the owner. But for myself, I can tell you the artist and the comic after I have my morning coffee, but any more than that I need notes. Hell, I'm lucky if I remember my kids' birthdays!! LOL!!

Third, portfolio or toploader can be a lot like bag and board or slab. Both have their pros and both have their cons, but there is obviously a market for slabs in a world of bag and boards.

Fourth, I'm thinking the true value is in the signature aspect. I'm thinking a "casual" collector would like the idea of buying a page from an artist at a con and having the option of have it put in a yellow label "slab" after it is signed. I'd think that younger artists and indie artists could even use it to help move some of their published pages.

Just more of my thoughts. I appreciate any and all feedback on this. It's nothing more than an idea right now, but who knows. And I doubt that I'm first to think of it.
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
@GAC Thanks!!!
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The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
This was posted awhile ago, the concept is similar to what you are proposing.

It allows you to type in the arts info. And self encapsulate.

https://comicskin.com/

The only thing is size. I dont own any comic art only sketches and such. Do original comic art pages typically come in a standard size?
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
@Bronte I actually have a couple comic skins. I use them to display some "themed" comics that aren't monetarily worth slabbing but are cool covers IMO. They work great for that!! But they are only comic book sized.

But OA art does come in various sizes. For instance I have a blue line page of a Simpsons comic that is about 9" x 12", if I remember correctly. The largest that I've seen, if I remember correctly, was like 16" x 22". The most common seem to fall between 11"x 17" to 13" x 19" approximately. In the Golden and Silver ages, the sizes varied wildly. I believe Marvel and DC have standard sizes for their artists, but I don't know what they are. And I'm thinking that has changed over the years as well. I have some Captain America pages from the early 80's that have Marvel printed on them. But the Falcon page that I used in my example is not marked Marvel and slightly larger all the way around. So size would be a factor to consider if one was looking to do this.
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If the viagra is working you should be well over a 9.8. xkonk private msg quote post Address this user
If you standardized to 11x17 so that you could also encapsulate 'standard' print size, that could open up the market. I have a number of prints from artists at cons that I'm going to at least think about framing and putting on the wall, but I would consider slabbing if the price point wasn't too different. Artists also sign their prints, so you could add verification if you felt like it.
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Collector SpiderTim private msg quote post Address this user
I consider myself more of an Art Collector than a comic collector and I would never use this service. Too much weight and space. Besides I like to see my art upclose. Definite no for me. I encapsulate comics because I can verify signatures I have gotten on it or because it improves on value for resale purposes but I don't think it would help a lot in the art department as for improving its value and frankly I am pretty sure no artist would sign a page that wasn't done by them to begin with, trust me, I've been there. Ask Steve Borock, he is a big art collector.
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
@SpiderTim I appreciate the feedback!! I agree that an artist probably would not sign a page that they did not do, but what about forgeries? I'd be surprised if every McFarlane signature is real. For example, I would think that a signed page from Spawn #1 would fetch more than that same page unsigned. So, in this example, the need to verify a signature because of monetary value is there.
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Collector SpiderTim private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse_O
@SpiderTim I appreciate the feedback!! I agree that an artist probably would not sign a page that they did not do, but what about forgeries? I'd be surprised if every McFarlane signature is real. For example, I would think that a signed page from Spawn #1 would fetch more than that same page unsigned. So, in this example, the need to verify a signature because of monetary value is there.


Maybe for low priced pages but who in there right mind would forge a signature on a piece of Original Art from McFarlane? lol

Generally speaking I think that signatures on OA would not highly impact the price point of a piece and this is very hard if not impossible to determine as a piece of Original Art is a unique one of a kind item unlike a comic were thousands were printed. So it would not be a very popular service as cost vs benefit is marginal except for maybe new Original Art Collectors who wouldn't now were to start collecting.
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiderTim
Maybe for low priced pages but who in there right mind would forge a signature on a piece of Original Art from McFarlane? lol


Well, that's kind of the point. Forgers do what they do because they know people think that way. I'm convinced that forgers are NOT in their right mind!!! Something in their head is off to begin with.

But again, good points!!! I totally get that the cost involved would be a major factor in this. But I was more interested in what people thought of this. It appears that the more serious, more established collectors do not see a need for it.

Which brings us back to the "casual" collector. Now I'm curious if OA has seen an uptick in sales these past 5-10 years. Has the movies effected that part of our hobby yet? I'd place money on it having effected commissioned art, but what about published? It'd be interesting to hear from OA dealers like Anthony Snyder to see if they have noticed an increase of casual collectors.
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Collector SpiderTim private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse_O
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiderTim
Maybe for low priced pages but who in there right mind would forge a signature on a piece of Original Art from McFarlane? lol


Well, that's kind of the point. Forgers do what they do because they know people think that way. I'm convinced that forgers are NOT in their right mind!!! Something in their head is off to begin with.

But again, good points!!! I totally get that the cost involved would be a major factor in this. But I was more interested in what people thought of this. It appears that the more serious, more established collectors do not see a need for it.

Which brings us back to the "casual" collector. Now I'm curious if OA has seen an uptick in sales these past 5-10 years. Has the movies effected that part of our hobby yet? I'd place money on it having effected commissioned art, but what about published? It'd be interesting to hear from OA dealers like Anthony Snyder to see if they have noticed an increase of casual collectors.


It certainly has been affected by it but it has been more affected by art representatives increasing the pricing on published and commissioned art which is part of the bubble forming in the comic book market.
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Collector IronMan private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse_O
@Bronte I actually have a couple comic skins. I use them to display some "themed" comics that aren't monetarily worth slabbing but are cool covers IMO. They work great for that!! But they are only comic book sized.

But OA art does come in various sizes. For instance I have a blue line page of a Simpsons comic that is about 9" x 12", if I remember correctly. The largest that I've seen, if I remember correctly, was like 16" x 22". The most common seem to fall between 11"x 17" to 13" x 19" approximately. In the Golden and Silver ages, the sizes varied wildly. I believe Marvel and DC have standard sizes for their artists, but I don't know what they are. And I'm thinking that has changed over the years as well. I have some Captain America pages from the early 80's that have Marvel printed on them. But the Falcon page that I used in my example is not marked Marvel and slightly larger all the way around. So size would be a factor to consider if one was looking to do this.


This is the true issue. Most OA from the past 30 years or so is 11x17. Older OA is often times 13x19. Sometimes even larger. And these dimensions are not exact. It's not unusual for the physical art board to be a little larger than "normal". So then you have the issue of are you going to trim half an inch off an edge (of white board, not the art obviously) to fit.

These are going to be huge slabs. The market is not large and the cost of sourcing the slabs is going to be way to high.

Frame your art and make your own label. I have a couple of framed pieces where I went to a trophy shop and had a bronze plate engraved that I then attached to the artwork's frame. Book, page, date, artist.
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Collector Siggy private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronMan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse_O
@Bronte I actually have a couple comic skins. I use them to display some "themed" comics that aren't monetarily worth slabbing but are cool covers IMO. They work great for that!! But they are only comic book sized.

But OA art does come in various sizes. For instance I have a blue line page of a Simpsons comic that is about 9" x 12", if I remember correctly. The largest that I've seen, if I remember correctly, was like 16" x 22". The most common seem to fall between 11"x 17" to 13" x 19" approximately. In the Golden and Silver ages, the sizes varied wildly. I believe Marvel and DC have standard sizes for their artists, but I don't know what they are. And I'm thinking that has changed over the years as well. I have some Captain America pages from the early 80's that have Marvel printed on them. But the Falcon page that I used in my example is not marked Marvel and slightly larger all the way around. So size would be a factor to consider if one was looking to do this.


This is the true issue. Most OA from the past 30 years or so is 11x17. Older OA is often times 13x19. Sometimes even larger. And these dimensions are not exact. It's not unusual for the physical art board to be a little larger than "normal". So then you have the issue of are you going to trim half an inch off an edge (of white board, not the art obviously) to fit.

These are going to be huge slabs. The market is not large and the cost of sourcing the slabs is going to be way to high.

Frame your art and make your own label. I have a couple of framed pieces where I went to a trophy shop and had a bronze plate engraved that I then attached to the artwork's frame. Book, page, date, artist.


Vampirella and GK/Dell pages were pretty darned big (several by Mike Royer in my Photo Gallery).
I need to find some extra large portfolios.
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COLLECTOR Towmater private msg quote post Address this user
@Siggy Many of the McFarlane Infinity Inc pages are oversized as well.

I have a large collection of OA. I would not slab any of it, nor purchase slabbed pieces of OA. I like looking at the textures that the artist sometimes creates on a page. Sam Kieth's art would be an example of what I'm writing about. I don't think a slabbed OA page would reveal those same textures. Also, you couldn't pull that page out and run your finger across it. Yes, I've done that.

Shipping slabbed pieces to the different auction houses would become cost prohibited and a pain if you are selling 10+ pages at a time or buying that amount. Also, if a slab broke in shipping you just aren't damaging 1 comic out of a 175,000 print run. You are damaging the only page/splash/cover in existence.
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Collector Siggy private msg quote post Address this user
And odds are high that a slab that big will break in transit. Certainly more so than a comic slab.
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