Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »
CBCS Comics
Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »
Art Original Artwork

What about proof sheet color guides?9323

Collector JLee1964 private msg quote post Address this user
Now that I look, every color is marked like this was a training exercise for the new colorist to show they know the codes by heart. Those are not from the actual production process.
Post 26 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
I do own some watercolor art from DEFIANT and Valiant. I know these are real.



















Shooter & Co. used a different process, so these are not exactly the same as color guides. They are watercolor paintings over 1st generation photocopies of the original art.

I think you've decided the best course of action. I do think they are very cool.
Post 27 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLee1964
Now that I look, every color is marked like this was a training exercise for the new colorist to show they know the codes by heart. Those are not from the actual production process.


In the old days, these were codes for the printer and they had rooms of little old ladies that actually colored the comics. They were literally guides. At least that is my novice understanding. Computers greatly improved the coloring process.
I've seen a lot of color guides that look like mine on the websites of art dealers. The cropping of codes at the edges and the photocopy look of the colors is what makes me confident they aren't real.
Post 28 IP   flag post
Collector JLee1964 private msg quote post Address this user
Great art! Really like the first one.
Post 29 IP   flag post
Collector JLee1964 private msg quote post Address this user
There were one or two art students working but no way old ladies had the hand to color. Steady hands and eyes of an eagle is needed for color work. Old ladies could click a computer but only 20 something kids could do fill in coloring. The rest had to be done by the artists.
Post 30 IP   flag post


Collector JLee1964 private msg quote post Address this user
After putting down the 2 pencil, no way I am handing my coloring off to someone who cant see what i can see. Colors would have been wrong.
Post 31 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLee1964
Great art! Really like the first one.


I'm a fan of Neal Adams. I talked him into doing a convention sketch of my girlfriend instead of a superhero. I took a cropped photograph of just her face so it would be as easy as possible. I'd much rather have that than a sketch of Batman. The only original art I have on the wall at home is a sick Ivan Brunetti piece. The Doc Martin watercolors are vivid, but if exposed to light, they'll fade
Post 32 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLee1964
There were one or two art students working but no way old ladies had the hand to color. Steady hands and eyes of an eagle is needed for color work. Old ladies could click a computer but only 20 something kids could do fill in coloring. The rest had to be done by the artists.


I'd have to listen again to the interview I'd heard. I'm not sure if it was Jim Shooter explaining it or JayJay Jackson. It was nothing like what they do today. I remember that JayJay was impressed by Richard Corben who could do the color separations in his head and paint the CMYK separately to blend correctly into the final product.
Post 33 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLee1964
After putting down the 2 pencil, no way I am handing my coloring off to someone who cant see what i can see. Colors would have been wrong.


I think it was Barry Windsor-Smith who said he walked into the Marvel offices and saw a receptionist coloring his artwork. He was horrified. I think he did it himself after that.
Post 34 IP   flag post
Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
I think we are discussing two different things here. The pages with the codes written on the sides are color guides. The pages with the color squares in the upper right corner are acetate color proofs. Before computers, comics were colored by a colorist. Just check the credits in any old book. The colorist did the guide. The guides go the printer, an acetate proof page is produced in four (?) different colors and black and reviewed before going into publication. I'm fairly certain that both are one of ones.
Post 35 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse_O
I think we are discussing two different things here. The pages with the codes written on the sides are color guides. The pages with the color squares in the upper right corner are acetate color proofs. Before computers, comics were colored by a colorist. Just check the credits in any old book. The colorist did the guide. The guides go the printer, an acetate proof page is produced in four (?) different colors and black and reviewed before going into publication. I'm fairly certain that both are one of ones.


Correct.
Post 36 IP   flag post
Collector CEPubDude private msg quote post Address this user
And the room of "Old Ladies" reference may have come from interviews I have read about Charltons production where the ladies cut out rubylith for the color separations based on color guides. But that may predate using gradients when most colors were flat especially interiors...
Post 37 IP   flag post
Rock, Paper, Scissors, Lizard, Spock Tedsaid private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLee1964
Thank you for the advice. Heritage auctions will be the right dealer for me.

Yeah, Heritage Auction would be your best bet for these. Or wait until the market realizes the value. But at HA you have to be lucky with the timing. I've seen comics, and especially animation cels, sell for a high amount in one auction, then come back in a year or two and sell for half as much or less.

This is particularly true for production cels. Just look at any recent auction, and pick a few, then look at previous prices for the same (or a similar) cel.

I don't know what the X factor is, to time it. Perhaps they do best when it is a big Animation Cel auction announced in advance, with plenty of previews and a wide variety to attract many buyers?

You might consider placing a few in other places, such as ComicLink. CL has a pretty robust comic art market. You could place some on the Exchange, priced where they should be. Any bidders on HA who do a quick Internet search would probably find them and see the prices, and that could give them more confidence in a higher bid.

Good luck!
Post 38 IP   flag post
Collector BrianGreensnips private msg quote post Address this user
I like @Tedsaid advice. Put a handful out there and see what the market demands. I think they are very attractive looking pieces from a great Silver Age era of material.
Post 39 IP   flag post
If the viagra is working you should be well over a 9.8. xkonk private msg quote post Address this user
The suggestions have turned to selling but you could also find some other place for them. @etapi65 (kind of jokingly) suggested a museum, and you could look for something along those lines like a school or library. Maybe an exhibit like the Marvel Universe of Super Heroes (https://www.fi.edu/exhibit/marvel-universe-super-heroes). Maybe an art school would just like to have them on the walls.
Post 40 IP   flag post
437394 40 15
This topic is archived. Start new topic?