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Collector Comicnewbie private msg quote post Address this user
I recently encountered a seller on eBay with whom I was negotiating a price that offered me a book in an older slab (CGC) for $15 less than one he had in a new CGC slab. Common, ridiculous or meaningful?
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Collector Drogio private msg quote post Address this user
Depends on the age of the slab and comic. I think the older newsprint comics had a piece of film placed inside the comic to help slow down the interior aging/browning of pages. And that should be replaced every 8-10 years...so older comics in CGC slabs should get a new slab eventually. That's going to cost you about $15 (plus shipping back & forth) which should be accounted for in the price relative to newer slabs.

Plus the older slabs are boring, or had more problems in security, durability. Should budget for a replacement when buying older slabs vs. new ones.

FYI - I don't think CBCS slabs have the film...even the older ones. Not sure if CGC still adds the film in their newer slabs either...
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Collector Comicnewbie private msg quote post Address this user
This book is from 1982. It was allegedly slabbed in 2012. Is that troublesome ?
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Collector Drogio private msg quote post Address this user
I wouldn't be concerned about a slab of that age. Likely many here have older CGC slabs than that.

Just plan on replacing the slab in 2-4 years.

I have about 10 or so I want to re-slab (age, damage aesthetics, etc.)...I wish they re-slabbed at conventions...I think there's a fair amount of cash they could bring in...I think the biggest deterrent to customers now is the shipping and TATs, so why not take that away and find an additional source of revenue at conventions.

But what do I know about replacing a slab, or what equipment they'd need to bring along? Plus, I'm sure their staff is limited right now at conventions and would rather focus on bringing in more new business.

Others here may be able to offer more insight.
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Collector BrianGreensnips private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comicnewbie
I recently encountered a seller on eBay with whom I was negotiating a price that offered me a book in an older slab (CGC) for $15 less than one he had in a new CGC slab. Common, ridiculous or meaningful?
Maybe one was centered better or had better eye appeal. I dought the age of the slab has much to do with it. Or maybe the older slab has some scratches on it. Were you able to compare both slabs?
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Collector Comicnewbie private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianGreensnips
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comicnewbie
I recently encountered a seller on eBay with whom I was negotiating a price that offered me a book in an older slab (CGC) for $15 less than one he had in a new CGC slab. Common, ridiculous or meaningful?
Maybe one was centered better or had better eye appeal. I dought the age of the slab has much to do with it. Or maybe the older slab has some scratches on it. Were you able to compare both slabs?

No I wasn't able to. The description does say the slab is in excellent condition.
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drogio
Depends on the age of the slab and comic. I think the older newsprint comics had a piece of film placed inside the comic to help slow down the interior aging/browning of pages. And that should be replaced every 8-10 years...so older comics in CGC slabs should get a new slab eventually. That's going to cost you about $15 (plus shipping back & forth) which should be accounted for in the price relative to newer slabs.

Plus the older slabs are boring, or had more problems in security, durability. Should budget for a replacement when buying older slabs vs. new ones.

FYI - I don't think CBCS slabs have the film...even the older ones. Not sure if CGC still adds the film in their newer slabs either...



I see no problem with the older CGC slabs. In fact some believe the grading was much tighter and a better quality book can be had from the older CGC slabs.

The "Film" Drogio is talking about is not actually a film, but a sheet of microfiber paper.
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Collector Drogio private msg quote post Address this user
Grabbed this from across the street, I stand corrected on the microfiber.

Is it necessary to get my CGC book reholdered every 10 (or 7, or 12, etc.) years?


No. The CGC holder is designed for long-term preservation and provides superior protection for your books. A properly handled and stored CGC-certified book can last for generations.

The CGC holder is made from high-quality materials and is entirely archival-safe. The inner well that holds books, for example, is comprised of PETG, a plastic that is well known to be archival-safe and extremely clear. This PETG well is placed inside of a durable outer case that is sonically welded to ensure a secure, tamper-evident seal.

Many comic books, particularly vintage ones, naturally release ("off gas" acidic molecules over time. The CGC holder is therefore designed to not have an air-tight seal, which would otherwise trap these acidic molecules.

For added long-term preservation, CGC inserts MicroChamber® paper into vintage books prior to encapsulation. This MicroChamber paper helps to neutralize the natural acidity of some books by using a specialized, proprietary “zeolite” that was designed to absorb and hold the molecules known to damage archival collections. That is why MicroChamber paper is used by many of the world’s most respected museums and institutions, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Getty Conservation Institute, the Louvre, the British Museum and the Northeast Document Conservation Center.

When CGC was first established in 2000, we thoroughly researched and implemented the best practices in archival preservation. We took a conservative approach and suggested that customers may wish to consider reholdering their books after approximately seven to ten years so that the MicroChamber paper could be replaced.

Today, however, we have the benefit of having graded 4.1 million books over a 17-year period. This is an incredibly large sample size that represents books of all eras, paper types, paper qualities, storage conditions and grades. CGC and its customers now have ample evidence that demonstrates it is not necessary to have your CGC books reholdered simply to replace the MicroChamber paper.
CGC’s archival-safe holder, with its combination of features that includes air permeability, MicroChamber paper and a secure, sonic seal, has been shown to provide superior long-term protection for the millions of books that have been encapsulated by CGC.

We have never seen a properly stored CGC-certified comic book that needed to be reholdered for archival reasons. Nonetheless, there are still a number of benefits to utilizing CGC’s reholder service, including the crystal-clear display, enhanced aesthetic and durable construction of CGC’s new holder.

It is important to remember that proper storage is essential to preserving your books, and collectors should take steps to minimize exposure to heat, humidity, vibration and light. CGC recommends that CGC-certified books be stored in a dark, dry, cool, temperature-controlled location.

CGC's holders have withstood the test of time and over the last 17 years have been shown to provide outstanding long-term protection and preservation. No other comic book grading services can make that claim.
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COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user
There's a plastic film in the center of some if my cbcs slabs, like asm129
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
I have Purchased the MicroChamber Paper for use with EGerber Mylars and Boards.
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Collector KingNampa private msg quote post Address this user
In my experience older CGC cases allowed for more movement of the books within. if they moved around too much it could have damaged the book within the case. For example I had a ASM 300 9.4 from 2001, CGC case. I was going to crack and press it but I noticed the corners were dinged pretty bad from years of moving around in the case. So did a reholder instead. I think a lot of reholders are done for that reason.

Cgc cases today pancake your books with newton rings , no movement.

On the flip side CGC Pre-2010 graded much tighter so if you were to press and resubmit books graded back then today, usually get a bump. CGC is super loose now.
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