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Art Original ArtworkQuestions

Pricing original art5200

Collector jrs private msg quote post Address this user
For those who collect or have purchased original art, do you have any advice for determining price when considering what to offer for a piece on ebay by an artist who has no prior sales?

There are a few pieces I'm interested in, but the list prices are so high that I'm not sure what to offer and don't want to lowball.
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Collector Darkga private msg quote post Address this user
OA depends on so many factors: The quality of the artwork,the time the artist takes to complete a piece, how in demand the artist is. Give us a link to the piece in question, I promise not to buy it from under you.
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Collector poka private msg quote post Address this user
Check the sites who offers the artist, the fab of the artist or elsewhere on 8nternet who offers the artist’s work. Either they have the price listed or you can enquire.

If there truly are no price points tha5 means that either the work of the artist is so rare that it is expensive or that the artist is so new that an expensive price on the art is not justified.
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs
For those who collect or have purchased original art, do you have any advice for determining price when considering what to offer for a piece on ebay by an artist who has no prior sales?

There are a few pieces I'm interested in, but the list prices are so high that I'm not sure what to offer and don't want to lowball.


It really depends upon what it is.
I've bought published artwork for as little as $10 a page.

Artists are going to sell the art for what they can get. A basic sketch from Neal Adams might cost $300, but an equally complex sketch from an unknown artist might be $5.

You really should pay what you think it's worth to you. Unless you're selling it, then you need to pay half of what it's worth to someone else.

Look at composition. Are you looking at the backs of characters? The artist shouldn't expect as much. Is it a dynamic front view of the character in a classic pose. He'll want more. Is there a lot of fine details like drawing a hundred boring bricks? The artist is going to expect more money.

It always helps if you don't care whether you get it or not. If you have a "must have this" attitude, you will likely overpay.
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COLLECTOR drchaos private msg quote post Address this user
Original art is a very different ball game from collectible comics. Pieces are unique, there is no GPA. Individual tastes and pricing can vary greatly. The deep end of the pool has some extremely high prices compared to comics.
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Collector SpiderTim private msg quote post Address this user
Deep end of the pool goes as far as $650k something for the Todd Mcfarlane's last cover of Amazing Spider-Man
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Artist are peculiar. I got a preliminary Wizard cover sketch of Wolverine for half price after the artist saw that I'd already purchased a preliminary watercolor sketch by Olivia. Artists like their work to be associated with the work of other reputable big name artists. They also want their name to be on the mind of the customer who is willing to pay big bucks for artwork.
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Collector jrs private msg quote post Address this user
This artist seems to be unknown, but it's a beautiful piece (at least to me, of course). Pretty dynamic portrayal of an iconic character, rendered in realistic pencils.

I'm going to make an offer and see what happens. Thanks for all of the input thus far.
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrs
This artist seems to be unknown, but it's a beautiful piece (at least to me, of course). Pretty dynamic portrayal of an iconic character, rendered in realistic pencils.

I'm going to make an offer and see what happens. Thanks for all of the input thus far.


I like to encourage people with real talent. If it's truly a beautiful piece, I don't think you'll have regrets.
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Collector Jeremy_K private msg quote post Address this user
lowball em and if they shut it down without a counter offer ask for a possible counteroffer. tell em your new at OA and it seems like a lot of money
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Collector Jeremy_K private msg quote post Address this user
anthonyscomicbookart.com is reasonable. so is onestopcomicshop on ebay
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COLLECTOR drchaos private msg quote post Address this user
Speaking of original art, many artists seem to have books with clear plastic sleeves to store and display their art (much like a large photo album).

Does anyone know where I can buy one or more of them at a reasonable price?
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COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user
unpublished work can be even more difficult to price btw
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Collector SpiderTim private msg quote post Address this user
They are called portfolios and the recognized brand is Itoya although you can find those books with clear plastic sleeves for sale at anthony snyder's site.
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Collector jrs private msg quote post Address this user
Thanks for all of the input. Working out some things now.
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Collector BabaLament private msg quote post Address this user
I've been commissioning original art, and most artists are extremely pleasant to work with, and reasonably negotiable on price based on the amount of time/effort involved.

There are artists whose work is considered more fine-art than comic-art, say Alex Ross or Todd McFarlane; and as such their original productions are far beyond my means. They have achieved the ability to charge such rates for their labor; I don't begrudge them success, but they've priced themselves out of my ability to buy anything.

There are some artists who use professional representation for original art sales. Use their website(s) & good luck.

There are always great local artists in the artists alley at conventions. Con commissions fill up fast, so if you see someone who does work that interests you, have a conversation, grab their card, send an e-mail, and work something out.
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Collector moodswing private msg quote post Address this user
I thought it was illegal to make money on copyrighted characters? Meaning Joe Smith cannot draw Wolverine and then sell the drawing because he doesn't own the character. Do I have this wrong? Or is this a gray area?
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COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user
I think it matters more when mass producing a print or book of a copyrighted character, instead of just one panel or sketch.
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