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Comics Restoration and ConservationQuestions

Date Stamps4932

Collector TommyJasmin private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944
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Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
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Originally Posted by Drogio
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Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944
I hate Date Stamps. I view and treat them like any other writing on a book.


I think the point is they don't effect grade, but they will affect asthetics and ultimately value on average.


It's part of the provenance of any book, and tells part of the story.


Creases, stains, rips, Writing etc... All tell a part of the story of a book. I just prefer not to have those flaws as part of the story.


The topic here is date stamps, not creases and stains. Nobody here would debate whether those are flaws. Whether a date stamp is a flaw is subjective, and apparently the grading companies have taken the side they are not flaws, since they don't affect grade. Again, to each their own but you can't lump 'em in with stains.
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drogio
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944
I hate Date Stamps. I view and treat them like any other writing on a book.


I think the point is they don't effect grade, but they will affect asthetics and ultimately value on average.


It's part of the provenance of any book, and tells part of the story.


Creases, stains, rips, Writing etc... All tell a part of the story of a book. I just prefer not to have those flaws as part of the story.


The topic here is date stamps, not creases and stains. Nobody here would debate whether those are flaws. Whether a date stamp is a flaw is subjective, and apparently the grading companies have taken the side they are not flaws, since they don't affect grade. Again, to each their own but you can't lump 'em in with stains.


Obviously some flaws are more severe than others, but flaws none the less.

I don't take my queues from grading companies, as the CEO, CFO and The Head Grader of my collection I have the final say in what MY guidelines are, not CGC or CBCS. My guideline's treat date stamps the same as any other outside writing. To me it doesn't matter who, why or when it was put there. It wasn't part of the originally printed book. I realize there is a wide acceptance of this flaw, and depending on it's location it may not be a major detraction on the book. I personally prefer my book not have this flaw and I personally down grade books with this flaw.
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by Gaard
This one isn't very pretty.



Yup, That's pretty ugly to me. Especially when the book is widely available without the ugly ink mark.
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COLLECTOR shrewbeer private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
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Originally Posted by shrewbeer
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Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
As an aside, Grey Label is just CGC's way of trying to make restoration respectable, IMO. I'm not too thrilled about it, it's still restoration,


Not restoration. Conserved books are just that; something was done to keep it from degrading further. Rusty staples cleaned off, a nasty tear sealed off from getting worse, paper deacidified, etc.

I applaud CGC for taking this step.


Actually CGC themselves state it's restoration. Go read it again SB, True they break out conserved as a special label type, but it is still restoration (they make a point to say that it is a subset of restoration type A-1).


Thats what scares people off conserved books. Conservation on a book that needs it is a good thing. Cleaned staples are better than rusty, etc. By the definition of restoration it is not, but then I suppose we could argue about that as well 😁

Resto = improving a books grade
Conserve = stopping a book from degrading further

That grey label is the first step to get our community to differentiate between the two.

On a somewhat related note, both grading companies give tape a pass; yet taping a tear is conservation. I wonder why tape is accepted so easily?
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Collector TommyJasmin private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by shrewbeer
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by shrewbeer
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
As an aside, Grey Label is just CGC's way of trying to make restoration respectable, IMO. I'm not too thrilled about it, it's still restoration,


Not restoration. Conserved books are just that; something was done to keep it from degrading further. Rusty staples cleaned off, a nasty tear sealed off from getting worse, paper deacidified, etc.

I applaud CGC for taking this step.


Actually CGC themselves state it's restoration. Go read it again SB, True they break out conserved as a special label type, but it is still restoration (they make a point to say that it is a subset of restoration type A-1).


Thats what scares people off conserved books. Conservation on a book that needs it is a good thing. Cleaned staples are better than rusty, etc. By the definition of restoration it is not, but then I suppose we could argue about that as well 😁


Actually I think this is a great point and am in full agreement here.
If removing some oxidation will prevent further oxidation, then best it's done, right?
With this in mind, I think I am starting to change my view on the new label.
Leave it to Shrewbeer to get met to change my view on something.

I just hope the guidelines and application of them are clear on this.
There will be a lot of lobbying to get many existing purple
labels reholdered. We are tagging all database sales with the new labels
going forward in Nosto, and so will be able to compute price index
differentials sometime next year when enough sales have been accumulated.
It will be interesting to see how much difference it makes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by shrewbeer

Resto = improving a books grade
Conserve = stopping a book from degrading further

That grey label is the first step to get our community to differentiate between the two.


Resto: Improving the appearance anyway.
And sure, numeric grade, but generally not value.



Quote:
Originally Posted by shrewbeer

On a somewhat related note, both grading companies give tape a pass; yet taping a tear is conservation. I wonder why tape is accepted so easily?


I'd need more info to comment on this one SB, are we talking only about conservation
grade taping materials? And are you saying both are soft on using tape?
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Collector TommyJasmin private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944


Obviously some flaws are more severe than others, but flaws none the less.

I don't take my queues from grading companies, as the CEO, CFO and The Head Grader of my collection I have the final say in what MY guidelines are, not CGC or CBCS. My guideline's treat date stamps the same as any other outside writing. To me it doesn't matter who, why or when it was put there. It wasn't part of the originally printed book. I realize there is a wide acceptance of this flaw, and depending on it's location it may not be a major detraction on the book. I personally prefer my book not have this flaw and I personally down grade books with this flaw.


Fair enough. If anything, this indicates you probably do a pretty thorough assessment when grading, and likely grade tighter than most.
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944


Obviously some flaws are more severe than others, but flaws none the less.

I don't take my queues from grading companies, as the CEO, CFO and The Head Grader of my collection I have the final say in what MY guidelines are, not CGC or CBCS. My guideline's treat date stamps the same as any other outside writing. To me it doesn't matter who, why or when it was put there. It wasn't part of the originally printed book. I realize there is a wide acceptance of this flaw, and depending on it's location it may not be a major detraction on the book. I personally prefer my book not have this flaw and I personally down grade books with this flaw.


Fair enough. If anything, this indicates you probably do a pretty thorough assessment when grading, and likely grade tighter than most.



Im absolutely OCD about condition, and probably to a fault.
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