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Comics Restoration and Conservation

Micro chamber paper438

Collector Quicksilver private msg quote post Address this user
What happens to micro chamber paper after 5-7 years? I've heard from a few people you should re-slab after 7 years because of the paper.
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Collector Oxbladder private msg quote post Address this user
The paper will no longer absorb what it is meant to. It will not harm the book in any way as it remains inert it just is not absorbing gasses anymore. There is no real need to reslab after 5-7 years.

CBCS doesn't use MC paper, that I know of, so there definitely is no need to reslab.
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Collector Nico private msg quote post Address this user
Not quite acurate.

Yes, the Micro stop working/absorbing gasses.
This means That the degeneration process begins again.

The reason cbcs don't use Micro is because they use Mylar as an inner box, that don't give gasses to the comic like cgc casing does.

When That is said, we are talking were small differences.

My personal collection has been stored way too hot at times and No charging of poly bags for 15 years.
I still got comics coming back with with pages or offwhite/white.
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Collector The_Curmudgeon private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nico
Yes, the Micro stop working/absorbing gasses.
This means That the degeneration process begins again.

Here is a thread with an extensive discussion on this topic.
click me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nico
The reason cbcs don't use Micro is because they use Mylar as an inner box, that don't give gasses to the comic.

They actually use PETG, not Mylar. I'm not sure what the properties are for it, but they made a big deal out of clarifying that in the thread about the new CGC case.
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Collector VillageIdiot private msg quote post Address this user
The comic book paper will eventually turn to dust. Thereby, once started this process will cause microscopic particles to disseminate throughout the book. This will in turn discolor, pit, and also eventually cause the paper of said book to lose all structural integrity, and then itself start the complete process of total, and catastrophic breakdown. Truly, very bad stuff...
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Collector Nico private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Curmudgeon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nico
Yes, the Micro stop working/absorbing gasses.
This means That the degeneration process begins again.

Here is a thread with an extensive discussion on this topic.
click me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nico
The reason cbcs don't use Micro is because they use Mylar as an inner box, that don't give gasses to the comic.

They actually use PETG, not Mylar. I'm not sure what the properties are for it, but they made a big deal out of clarifying that in the thread about the new CGC case.


Yeah.. Not too sure what the glycol does to the Mylar.
Perhaps just a copyright problem?

Anyone know That?
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Collector esaravo private msg quote post Address this user
PET stands for polyethylene terephthalate, which is a common polyester resin that is also sold under the trade name Dacron polyester. PET is commonly used to make water and soft drink plastic bottles. It can also be drawn into a film (such as the trademarked Mylar). Ethylene glycol-modified PET is called PETG. This allows the product to be injection molded or sheet extruded into various semi-rigid to rigid shapes.
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Collector The_Curmudgeon private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by esaravo
PET stands for polyethylene terephthalate, which is a common polyester resin that is also sold under the trade name Dacron polyester. PET is commonly used to make water and soft drink plastic bottles. It can also be drawn into a film (such as the trademarked Mylar). Ethylene glycol-modified PET is called PETG. This allows the product to be injection molded or sheet extruded into various semi-rigid to rigid shapes.


Sooo...still Mylar?
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Collector esaravo private msg quote post Address this user
Yes and no. They are all forms of polyester resins. Mylar is a form that is drawn into sheets or films of various thicknesses. It has more than one form (I think Mylar D is the top of the line) and is a registered trademark of DuPont. By adding different substances to PET you alter its chemistry to allow you to shape, form, and use it somewhat differently.
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Collector The_Curmudgeon private msg quote post Address this user
Does that mean that it's the still acid free and archive safe?
No off-gassing, ETC?
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Collector esaravo private msg quote post Address this user
These products are used because of their high strength, stiffness, and clarity. In addition, they can act as a gas/vapor barrier and are chemically stable (non-reactive). There will always be some amount of by products in manufactured substances, but they are considered safe for use in drinking containers by the government and are used by the Library of Congress for archival purposes. Using recycled PET can cause problems such as increasing by products and also causing a decrease in clarity and strength.
There have been numerous posts on this topic in the past. The real test is how they hold up over time. If they are kept in the right environment (relatively dry, no high heat) they should outlast us and our grandchildren's children.
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Collector Oxbladder private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Curmudgeon
Quote:
Originally Posted by esaravo
PET stands for polyethylene terephthalate, which is a common polyester resin that is also sold under the trade name Dacron polyester. PET is commonly used to make water and soft drink plastic bottles. It can also be drawn into a film (such as the trademarked Mylar). Ethylene glycol-modified PET is called PETG. This allows the product to be injection molded or sheet extruded into various semi-rigid to rigid shapes.


Sooo...still Mylar?


Not exactly but similar. Mylar has a different set of molecules. The properties are similar though.
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Collector SpiderTim private msg quote post Address this user
Has anyone opened a CBCS slab and seen the product upfront?
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Collector Nico private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiderTim
Has anyone opened a CBCS slab and seen the product upfront?


Ask Pete from heroes haven, he has cracked a ton of slabs, from All companies.
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