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Collector Mio private msg quote post Address this user
Does anybody know how to do it well? Raw books are no problem, but when I take photos of slabs I either get way too much glare/haze from the slab of reflections from everything.

CBCS uses a camera for its imaging, but I doubt they will give out the secret.
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Collector vacaboca private msg quote post Address this user
I think the best approach is a CCD legal-size scanner... from what I understand, the CCD ones support a proper focusing so the slabs don't end up blurry. All of my experiences trying to photograph or scan my slabs have been pretty unsatisfactory.
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Collector Watcher private msg quote post Address this user
There's an entire post on this from last week...basically, I think it really depends on the scanner. Mine does not work with slabs so I just take a pic with my phone and load it to the computer . DrChaos ran down all the viable scanners and prices..
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Collector vacaboca private msg quote post Address this user
Thanks for the pointer, @Watcher, I missed that one! Here's a link, @Milo:

https://forum.cbcscomics.com/topic/1881/page/1/scanning-questions/
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Collector Mio private msg quote post Address this user
Thanks and understood about a scanner, but I do not like accumulating extra things and have limited space. So I am looking to maximise the DSLR.
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Collector vacaboca private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mio
I am looking to maximise the DSLR.


In that case, bright indirect lighting, and a giant dark drape behind the camera to eliminate reflections is probably the best approach. I tried that in quick-and-dirty fashion on my recent post, just with the camera on my iPad... it was fine to show the books and their grade, but crap for any actual detail on the quality of the comic itself. You could probably set up a tripod, a stand, a drape and an indirect light or flash if you wanted good detail and consistency.

EDIT: if you look at my recent pics, you'll see the "quality" of the result... it was a pink blanket draped over me, while I adjusted my position to kill most of the reflections. Here's the full-res album, for what it's worth.
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Collector TruckJohnson private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mio
Does anybody know how to do it well? Raw books are no problem, but when I take photos of slabs I either get way too much glare/haze from the slab of reflections from everything.

CBCS uses a camera for its imaging, but I doubt they will give out the secret.


Your lighting source is too harsh and you're getting a reflection. Solutions: move the slab and/or yourself until the reflection is gone. Play with shooting above vs straight on etc. Also get a white board to bounce or block the light in order to remove the reflection. You should also try shooting using natural light instead of a light source. But make sure it's a soft light and not too close to the subject. If you use an iphone, you don't need a ton of light to get good clear shots.
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Collector Mio private msg quote post Address this user
OK - I will see if I can try it out. With the tripod,hopefully it works well.
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Collector Sirtoddington private msg quote post Address this user
I use a large format scanner at work for scanning my slabs. i also made a custom jig if you can even call it that to place the slabs in so they always scan flush & never require having to recrop.
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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
Youtube has a few good videos about photographing reflective surfaces. Basically, it's all about diffusing the light source, camera angle and settings. It looks like some trial and error can be involved.
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