Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »
CBCS Comics
Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »

OT; What are you eating or cooking, part 216960

If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
I didn't put bananas in the pancakes. Coconut flour absorbs a lot of liquid. My recipe calls for 1 cup of AP flour. I substitute 1/3 cup of coconut flour and use 2/3 cup of AP flour.
Post 501 IP   flag post
If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
You may want added a tablespoon or two of additional liquid to the batter. I use milk. It's a little trial and error at first. The type of flour also can make a difference. I use White Lily AP and Bob's Red Mill coconut flour.
Post 502 IP   flag post
Collector Byrdibyrd private msg quote post Address this user
I'll see how that works once I can get ingredients together. I love good, fluffy pancakes with some fruit. The fruit keeps me from drowning them in syrup.
Post 503 IP   flag post
Masculinity takes a holiday. EbayMafia private msg quote post Address this user
I recently looked up the definitions and learned that we are a "supper" family, not a "dinner" family. Tonight for supper I was craving a bologna sandwich on white bread with a slice of buffalo jack cheese on the side.
Post 504 IP   flag post
If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
For my grandparents, it was always breakfast, dinner, and supper.

I'm not sure when it became breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
Post 505 IP   flag post


Masculinity takes a holiday. EbayMafia private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrWatson
For my grandparents, it was always breakfast, dinner, and supper.

I'm not sure when it became breakfast, lunch, and dinner.


That's what I read also. That the largest meal was eaten earlier in the day, and supper was a smaller, easily assembled informal supplement to that meal, in the evening. Maybe the early dinner was a break from the workday heat in farming communities?
Just guessing it may have also had to do with providing a meal for the workers before they went off on their own. If farms tended to employ single young men, it would have been useful to them to get their main meal at work. They probably didn't even have food preparation facilities in their living quarters.
Post 506 IP   flag post
If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Supper last night was sausage & sauerkraut, mashed potatoes, cornbread.


Post 507 IP   flag post
Suck it up, buttercup!! KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
Wow...just wow... I've made mayonnaise before but the immersion blender method is like 2 minutes all ingredients in one container and done!!!




Post 508 IP   flag post
Masculinity takes a holiday. EbayMafia private msg quote post Address this user
@KatKomics what are the ingredients in your mayo?
Post 509 IP   flag post
CBCS Boomhauer HeinzDad private msg quote post Address this user
This year was only the second time we grew garlic. We did better the first year. I think I have it narrowed down to 2 reasons.




Post 510 IP   flag post
The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
And the 2 reasons were?
Post 511 IP   flag post
CBCS Boomhauer HeinzDad private msg quote post Address this user
They are under an over hang on an opposite wind direction than normal, not enough natural water. Second, it was seed from last years instead of roided out garbage clove from the grocery which is what I did year one. I also watered year 1 when I was told I shouldn't.
Post 512 IP   flag post
The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
@HeinzDad

Can you ever grow a vegetable or fruit to be organic if it had roots in the past of artificial fertilizer and man made pesticides?
Post 513 IP   flag post
CBCS Boomhauer HeinzDad private msg quote post Address this user
Thats one for the Ask Questions here Thread. Thats mind altering.
Post 514 IP   flag post
Collector Byrdibyrd private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronte
@HeinzDad

Can you ever grow a vegetable or fruit to be organic if it had roots in the past of artificial fertilizer and man made pesticides?

Long, long ago my grandpa went through the process of getting his Valencia orange orchard certified organic. Before he could call the fruits organic, one thing he had to do was prove that pesticides and non-organic fertilizers and such had not been used on the trees/soil/etc. for something like THREE to FIVE YEARS. At the time it was a big deal when he had that done. Not sure how individual state laws might affect that process, and it may have changed over time, but my grandpa had his orchard certified back in the 70's.
Post 515 IP   flag post
The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
Interesting. I kinda figured there had to be a way to do it given everything has to have been tainted at one point or another...
Post 516 IP   flag post
CBCS Boomhauer HeinzDad private msg quote post Address this user

Post 517 IP   flag post
Collector Byrdibyrd private msg quote post Address this user
@HeinzDad
Those look Dee-licious!
Post 518 IP   flag post
Collector BrianGreensnips private msg quote post Address this user
@HeinzDad Those kabobs look delicious. Healthy eating there too.
Post 519 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Not quite cooking, but it falls into that general territory. Learned all of this in no time at all and turned out my first stored batch less than 24 hours after discovering it.

I'd been gifted bottles of vodka in "alien" decanters, but being a die-hard ale drinker these remained unopened in my beverage cabinet since 1947 (yes, that's a joke). By pure accident I came across a recipe for making vanilla extract which is VERY expensive when purchased by brand from a store. To my surprise, the homemade recipe called for vodka and the addition of vanilla beans readily available on-line from Amazon, etc.

About the only culinary skill required for making vanilla extract is splitting each vanilla bean lengthways with a sharp knife before adding to a bottle of vodka (approximately 15 to 20 split beans per 750ml by volume). Then sealing and storing the container in a cabinet or pantry for a period of months (two minimum, six to twelve being optimum) while the vanilla bean caviar infuses the vodka, ...and voila!

The one deliberation involved is deciding which vanilla beans to purchase (Madagascar & Tahitian most frequently offered) and whether to buy Grade A or Grade B beans at the price and quantity desired. Either grade is suitable for extract, Grade A beans usually being a bit more expensive. Those contain slightly more moisture and preferred for gourmet cooking purposes like the preparation of exotic deserts such as crème brûlée.

As you'd expect, there are YouTube videos demonstrating the precise science involved in extracting vanilla, flavor nuances ascribed to different varieties, etc., but it ain't brain surgery!
Post 520 IP   flag post
If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
The breakfast of champions.



Post 521 IP   flag post
If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
Not quite cooking, but it falls into that general territory. Learned all of this in no time at all and turned out my first stored batch less than 24 hours after discovering it.

I'd been gifted bottles of vodka in "alien" decanters, but being a die-hard ale drinker these remained unopened in my beverage cabinet since 1947 (yes, that's a joke). By pure accident I came across a recipe for making vanilla extract which is VERY expensive when purchased by brand from a store. To my surprise, the homemade recipe called for vodka and the addition of vanilla beans readily available on-line from Amazon, etc.

About the only culinary skill required for making vanilla extract is splitting each vanilla bean lengthways with a sharp knife before adding to a bottle of vodka (approximately 15 to 20 split beans per 750ml by volume). Then sealing and storing the container in a cabinet or pantry for a period of months (two minimum, six to twelve being optimum) while the vanilla bean caviar infuses the vodka, ...and voila!

The one deliberation involved is deciding which vanilla beans to purchase (Madagascar & Tahitian most frequently offered) and whether to buy Grade A or Grade B beans at the price and quantity desired. Either grade is suitable for extract, Grade A beans usually being a bit more expensive. Those contain slightly more moisture and preferred for gourmet cooking purposes like the preparation of exotic deserts such as crème brûlée.

As you'd expect, there are YouTube videos demonstrating the precise science involved in extracting vanilla, flavor nuances ascribed to different varieties, etc., but it ain't brain surgery!

I understand that your vodka was "free," but if you have to buy the vodka...
Post 522 IP   flag post
Collector Frontier2Xterra private msg quote post Address this user



This should be interesting.
Post 523 IP   flag post
Collector Byrdibyrd private msg quote post Address this user
@Frontier2Xterra
Ouch! Yummy perhaps, but still ouch!
Post 524 IP   flag post
The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
Who knew? Leftover soggy nachos and chicken quesadilla could be reheated in air fryer to crispy status....


Post 525 IP   flag post
Collector Byrdibyrd private msg quote post Address this user
@Bronte
Those look yummy! I'd add a little salsa to dip or drizzle.
Post 526 IP   flag post
The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
@Byrdibyrd
These were from Chili's the semi fast food company. I had a coupon for free appetizers so I figured I'd give it a shot. Not too bad. Definitely prefer home made but if you are out anyways and need to kill some time before an appointment it's okay
Post 527 IP   flag post
Collector Byrdibyrd private msg quote post Address this user
@Bronte
I totally failed to recognise Chili's handiwork! I don't go there very often. They're not so bad and are one of the few places to get a steak for well under $30.
Post 528 IP   flag post
The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
I think I ordered steak a couple of times from them but its definitely not a regular thing. I prefer Longhorns or Texas Roadhouse for my steaks. I've never been to anything fancy like Ruth Chris or Mortons though....
Post 529 IP   flag post
Collector Byrdibyrd private msg quote post Address this user
@Bronte I love a good steak, but they're so pricey that I take 'em where I can get 'em sometimes. When I have the cashola I do prefer a proper steakhouse, though.
Post 530 IP   flag post
496725 535 30
Log in or sign up to compose a reply.