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Items I notice my son and his friends playing with...16679

COLLECTOR Towmater private msg quote post Address this user
I started looking at what my son and his friends, who are 8 years old, play with in the real world or have played with. It has led me to start putting a list together of toys that will have big time nostalgia for them in 30 years when they all have disposable income.

1) Paw Patrol figures, Tower, and the different vehicles they drive/fly.
2) Nerf Gun products
3) Lego Superhero sets and mini figures
4) Lego Minecraft sets
5) Lego Jurassic Park sets and mini figures


(Notice that I didn't write comics, Star Wars, or hot wheels in the above.)

I did some research on Nerf weapons and their history.
I was amazed to see that over 1500 different guns/blasters have been manufactured and distributed to date. Loads of opportunities to collect and store a NIB toy there. For example, the Kenner Finger Pops Popper. That's the toy that is recognized to have spawned into Nerf guns.

I'm also curious how long the present trend of owning and collecting physical copies of games will last. My son's pals have all started using sites like Steam to own, store, and access games. In the future, I believe there will be a trend away from contemporary collectibles.
People are shifting away from other items that were valued by one's parents and grandparents - consider the Persian rug market and what's happen to it.
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If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Status symbols change over time regardless of age and peer pressure.
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COLLECTOR Towmater private msg quote post Address this user
Thanks for agreeing with me.
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Collector jcbruch private msg quote post Address this user
I agree. Same with my son I can not get him to read a comic even though he likes all the marvel movies. I Ben the newer generation is now pushing nft’s, digital one of a kinds, as collectibles.

I think there will always be a demand for physical copies of comics but that demand will be lower on the future and supply might be more than demand in certain comics.
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If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Putting too much stock in the digital world will lead to a Matrix type future. Hold on to the tangible.
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Not trying to be an ass since February 12, 2020. HulkSmash private msg quote post Address this user
I agree with Paw Patrol

Possibly PJ Masks and Marvel has a similar Disney Jr. Spider-Man show featuring Kid versions of Peter Parker, Gwen Stacy, & Miles Morales and appearances of other Marvel characters.


I’m on the fence on LEGOs. They are multi generational and specific sets aren’t required to build something; although I could see specific sets being valuable in some way.

The video game market has long shifted to digital. Yes physical exists and yes a majority of buyers prefer a digital copy, but games are so large now that the “physical” copy is installed and then the disc is basically a license key to boot the game. Some games no longer reflect the original physical copy and the new version is downloaded in its place making the disc solely a license to use the software. That happened with DOOM 2015; insert the original disc and only a few hundred MBs are installed from disc and the other 49 something GBs are downloaded. Don’t even get me started on the unfinished games they release them pile update after update until you get a playable game.
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Collector SupaCor private msg quote post Address this user
ill pipe in about the legos... a couple years back the ghostbuster firehouse set came out for about 250ish... good luck now. the first lego hulkbuster was like 20... good luck now. i started buying two of certain sets. the lego market is just as nuts as comic books! i just picked up doubles of all the spidey and his amazing friends lego set
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TL;DR Davethebrave private msg quote post Address this user
I disagree with the general premise but I like the idea of diversification.

Most modern toys will likely have limited value. Too many people keeping toys in boxes and too much initial supply. Also, this is not contrarian - plenty hoard this stuff.

As for digital vs physical items, I have a hand in the digital side (and before it was trendy)… and despite stupendous growth I have more long-term faith in old rare comics.

Want to spec - target the currently discarded.

Again, I like the idea of diversification (only partially effective though since these categories are highly correlated) but the notion that “old will be out” is something that gets repeated by every generation and rarely comes to fruition.

Cars, homes (size and preference), watches, etc etc. Long list that you can go back many decades to read about prognosticators warning of imminent obsolescence and immediate destruction in values…

History usually repeats itself and true paradigm shifts are few and far between.
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If I could, I would. I swear. DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by SupaCor
ill pipe in about the legos... a couple years back the ghostbuster firehouse set came out for about 250ish... good luck now. the first lego hulkbuster was like 20... good luck now. i started buying two of certain sets. the lego market is just as nuts as comic books! i just picked up doubles of all the spidey and his amazing friends lego set

This had me interested. I looked them up and the only thing they had in common with Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends was in name only.
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Masculinity takes a holiday. EbayMafia private msg quote post Address this user
I wonder what the little kids in China will be nostalgic for in 30 years. That might be a better opportunity.
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Not trying to be an ass since February 12, 2020. HulkSmash private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by EbayMafia
I wonder what the little kids in China will be nostalgic for in 30 years. That might be a better opportunity.
Elvis Presley Ramen. I’m sure it exists at least in Japan.
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Suck it up, buttercup!! KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by EbayMafia
I wonder what the little kids in China will be nostalgic for in 30 years. That might be a better opportunity.


Vintage sewing machines or other sweat shop equipment?
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The apple sauce and pudding were the best part... Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
@KatKomics

Talk about negative stereotypes... geeze
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Masculinity takes a holiday. EbayMafia private msg quote post Address this user
OK, let me clarify: I think the history from the US may be more likely to repeat itself in other cultures than in the US. Money is moving globally, discretionary income is spreading out amongst bigger populations. As @Davethebrave hints at, we now have a culture of preservation in the U.S. for items that could be collectible. If we are looking 30 years down the road, it may be wiser to look globally rather than domestically to consider what childhood artifacts will be cherished but scarce in the future.
You may actually have millions in China or India who, as adults, have the financial capacity to get the things they either had or wanted to have as children.
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Suck it up, buttercup!! KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
My son is now 14? No more physical music or games. They still like pokemon and once he found a decent card at a thrift shop for like $3 for a bag of cards and sold it for over $100 a few minutes later at the local card/gaming shop...

He will read the odd comic now and then and is generally interested in reading the trades with collected Infinity Gauntlet etc....

I've picked up skylander, spongebob and some other comics on the off chance the kids get nostalgic in 20 yrs!
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Suck it up, buttercup!! KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
How about early generation smart cameras/ portable teletype handsets? (no one uses the phone function)
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Masculinity takes a holiday. EbayMafia private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatKomics
How about early generation smart cameras/ portable teletype handsets? (no one uses the phone function)

Something along those lines could make sense to me. First generation flip phones. First generation phones with cameras, etc. Those fat Motorola phones that we clipped on our belts and flipped open were pretty iconic in my opinion.
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Collector 50AE_DE private msg quote post Address this user
None of my boys are even interested in the toys they had when they were kids and I don't see it changing. Kids these days are so into digital whatever, but I think certain things like video games may do well especially Nintendo's various DS systems and Pokémon cartridges.
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Collector dfoster43 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by EbayMafia
I wonder what the little kids in China will be nostalgic for in 30 years. That might be a better opportunity.


Probably little Lego Playsets of Nike assembly lines
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COLLECTOR Towmater private msg quote post Address this user
@Davethebrave People didn't save Paw Patrol items when they hit the market 5+ years ago. They let their kids play with them. It was popular but not like it is now. Some of that stuff has started to gain traction on eBay.
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If the viagra is working you should be well over a 9.8. xkonk private msg quote post Address this user
My daughter has a large assortment of (mostly) second-hand Barbies, Legos, and Transformers. She isn't quite 7 though, and my personal nostalgia traps go back to when I was closer to 10-12, so hard to say what will stick.

I think there's also a general question of the options today versus the monoculture we had as children. Cable TV was on the upswing but not dominant (for me), so lots of people had your standard 6 channels or whatever, and there were far fewer movie studios and distribution options. I don't know that "popular" now means the same thing as "popular" then, which means that future popularity would be less broad and more pockets of various things here and there.
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TL;DR Davethebrave private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Towmater
@Davethebrave People didn't save Paw Patrol items when they hit the market 5+ years ago. They let their kids play with them. It was popular but not like it is now. Some of that stuff has started to gain traction on eBay.


Just remember that there are many, many item lines associated with these brands/characters. It seriously dilutes the (sustainable) value appreciation.

The attribute of classic comics that make them so investable is they are like the point of a large cone/pyramid. Single points of reference.

Sustainable is key. Boxed toys…Speculative bumps… sure… but that is why I like it as part of diversification. Not something I see as blue chip, “core” investment.

I buy my kids toys and sometimes set aside an extra cool piece (unopened). But a lot of this takes up space (physical and mental) that I don’t have.

Funny enough I have an unopened PS5 just sitting around. Given I could have gotten 50-100% over market… but I will either eventually use it or maybe it will be an odd artifact. How many people keep super hot gaming systems unopened?

(Answer: probably a lot hahaha)
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