Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »
CBCS Comics
Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Thread bump with a classic Arrow cover by Paul Gustavson. From my collection.


Post 26 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by circumstances
Thread bump with a classic Arrow cover by Paul Gustavson. From my collection.


Classic cover! And great copy there!
Post 27 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Quote:
Originally Posted by circumstances
Thread bump with a classic Arrow cover by Paul Gustavson. From my collection.


Classic cover! And great copy there!


Thanks.

If I'm the only one posting Centaurs, I'm going to run out pretty fast!
Post 28 IP   flag post
Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
Believe me....if I had Centaur books I'd be showing them off here!! Great books!!
Post 29 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Somebody called for Centaurs?
Post 30 IP   flag post


Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Somebody called for Centaurs?


I did indeed!

Awesome!
Post 31 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@circumstances Thanks! I have a new one to add to the collection arriving soon. I'm stoked! But have others to share in the meantime over the next few days
Post 32 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
@circumstances Thanks! I have a new one to add to the collection arriving soon. I'm stoked! But have others to share in the meantime over the next few days


oooo!

i haven't picked up a new centaur in ages. funny pages 8 last year, and star comics 6 two years ago
Post 33 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Just thought i'd post a brief history on the publisher from it's Wikipedia page for those who may look in here and are discovering these for the first time.

Centaur Publications (also known as Centaur Comics) (1938–1942) was one of the earliest American comic book publishers. During their short existence, they created several colorful characters, including Bill Everett's Amazing-Man.

History:
Comics Magazine Company
Centaur developed primarily from the Comics Magazine Company, Inc. In 1936, comic-book entrepreneur Everett M. "Busy" Arnold gave financial or other unspecified help to that New York City-based firm, founded by John Mahon and Bill Cook, former employees of Major Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson's National Allied Publications (the primary forerunner of DC Comics). The duo published the premiere issue of The Comics Magazine (May 1936),[1] using inventory content from National Allied's submissions. (One collector/historian suggests this was in lieu of pay.[2])

Among the Comics Magazine Company's original features was Dr. Mystic the Occult Detective (not to be confused with Mr. Mystic of newspapers' "The Spirit Section". This two-page feature was by future Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, and was part of their Doctor Occult continuity, with the name changed for trademark consideration. This was the beginning of a serial that introduced the villain Koth, and the Seven, that continued into DC's More Fun Comics #14–17 (issues also designated as vol. 2 #2–5).

The company's flagship title, the eponymous Comics Magazine, premiered with a May 1936 cover date. That comic-book series featured the first masked hero in American comics, writer-artist George Brenner's the Clock, in the November 1936 issue.

Ultem Publications:
Another entrepreneur, Harry "A" Chesler, published Star Comics and Star Ranger through his own Chesler Publications, each with first issues cover-dated February 1937. These titles were soon bought out by I. W. Ullman and Frank Z. Temerson's Ultem Publications. In September 1937, Ultem acquired the Comics Magazine Company's titles, retaining Chesler as the packager for both his own previous titles and the two that were continued from the Comics Magazine Co.[3] Financial difficulties forced Ultem to sell some of its properties, including the Clock, to "Busy" Arnold's Quality Comics.

Centaur Comics:

Amazing Mystery Funnies No. 1 (1938), art by Bill Everett
By January 1938, Ultem was bought out by Joe Hardie, Fred Gardner, and Raymond Kelly's Centaur Publications, Inc., which had been publishing pulp magazines since at least 1933. Hardie, Gardner, and Kelly used this base to create Centaur Comics, which began publishing in March 1938. They also drew on the back inventory of stories to fill out the early issues of their new titles with reprints. Centaur Publications, Inc. ceased production at the end of 1940, but continued to produce comics under the name Comic Corporation of America.

Centaur ceased publication four years later, primarily due to poor distribution, but in that period had created several colorful characters, including Bill Everett's Amazing Man. Everett would later go on to comics fame by introducing Namor The Submariner to Timely (later Atlas, then Marvel Comics.) Everett's first nationally published comic work was the cover of Amazing Mystery Funnies No. 1 (1938.)
Post 34 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Just thought i'd post a brief history on the publisher from it's Wikipedia page for those who may look in here and are discovering these for the first time.

Centaur Publications (also known as Centaur Comics) (1938–1942) was one of the earliest American comic book publishers. During their short existence, they created several colorful characters, including Bill Everett's Amazing-Man.

History:
Comics Magazine Company
Centaur developed primarily from the Comics Magazine Company, Inc. In 1936, comic-book entrepreneur Everett M. "Busy" Arnold gave financial or other unspecified help to that New York City-based firm, founded by John Mahon and Bill Cook, former employees of Major Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson's National Allied Publications (the primary forerunner of DC Comics). The duo published the premiere issue of The Comics Magazine (May 1936),[1] using inventory content from National Allied's submissions. (One collector/historian suggests this was in lieu of pay.[2])

Among the Comics Magazine Company's original features was Dr. Mystic the Occult Detective (not to be confused with Mr. Mystic of newspapers' "The Spirit Section". This two-page feature was by future Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, and was part of their Doctor Occult continuity, with the name changed for trademark consideration. This was the beginning of a serial that introduced the villain Koth, and the Seven, that continued into DC's More Fun Comics #14–17 (issues also designated as vol. 2 #2–5).

The company's flagship title, the eponymous Comics Magazine, premiered with a May 1936 cover date. That comic-book series featured the first masked hero in American comics, writer-artist George Brenner's the Clock, in the November 1936 issue.

Ultem Publications:
Another entrepreneur, Harry "A" Chesler, published Star Comics and Star Ranger through his own Chesler Publications, each with first issues cover-dated February 1937. These titles were soon bought out by I. W. Ullman and Frank Z. Temerson's Ultem Publications. In September 1937, Ultem acquired the Comics Magazine Company's titles, retaining Chesler as the packager for both his own previous titles and the two that were continued from the Comics Magazine Co.[3] Financial difficulties forced Ultem to sell some of its properties, including the Clock, to "Busy" Arnold's Quality Comics.

Centaur Comics:

Amazing Mystery Funnies No. 1 (1938), art by Bill Everett
By January 1938, Ultem was bought out by Joe Hardie, Fred Gardner, and Raymond Kelly's Centaur Publications, Inc., which had been publishing pulp magazines since at least 1933. Hardie, Gardner, and Kelly used this base to create Centaur Comics, which began publishing in March 1938. They also drew on the back inventory of stories to fill out the early issues of their new titles with reprints. Centaur Publications, Inc. ceased production at the end of 1940, but continued to produce comics under the name Comic Corporation of America.

Centaur ceased publication four years later, primarily due to poor distribution, but in that period had created several colorful characters, including Bill Everett's Amazing Man. Everett would later go on to comics fame by introducing Namor The Submariner to Timely (later Atlas, then Marvel Comics.) Everett's first nationally published comic work was the cover of Amazing Mystery Funnies No. 1 (1938.)


Great info.

Many Timely giants were with Centaur in the late '30s.

Bill Everett, Carl Burgos, Paul Gustavson, Tarpe Mills.

Not to mention Will Eisner, Bob Kane, Jack Cole, and Siegel and Shuster.
Post 35 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@circumstances All important giants in the history of the medium. They certainly had an eye for tapping talent
Post 36 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Funny Pages Vol. 3, #1, February, 1939.

Notable for "The Case of the Missing Heir," a Bruce Wayne prototype story by Bob Kane. It is a Gerber 7, but there have only been 8 graded by CGC (none higher than 7.0) and 1 by CBCS (a .5).


Post 37 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by circumstances
Funny Pages Vol. 3, #1, February, 1939.

Notable for "The Case of the Missing Heir," a Bruce Wayne prototype story by Bob Kane. It is a Gerber 7, but there have only been 8 graded by CGC (none higher than 7.0) and 1 by CBCS (a .5).


Isn't it nice to able to add CBCS census count to rare golden age issues now also?
That one can be pretty pricey. Very cool rarity! Only wished i 'discovered' them earlier. But i am very proud of the examples i do own.
Post 38 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Quote:
Originally Posted by circumstances
Funny Pages Vol. 3, #1, February, 1939.

Notable for "The Case of the Missing Heir," a Bruce Wayne prototype story by Bob Kane. It is a Gerber 7, but there have only been 8 graded by CGC (none higher than 7.0) and 1 by CBCS (a .5).


Isn't it nice to able to add CBCS census count to rare golden age issues now also?
That one can be pretty pricey. Very cool rarity! Only wished i 'discovered' them earlier. But i am very proud of the examples i do own.


It's very nice to have that CBCS census info!
Post 39 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Can't let @circumstances do all the heavy lifting by him self
Post 40 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Can't let @circumstances do all the heave lifting by him self


Yay!
Post 41 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Star Comics #6, September, 1937. Oversized issue. 6 universal on CGC census, zero on CBCS. A Gerber 7. From my collection.


Post 42 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Funny Picture Stories #4, February, 1937. 7 universal on the CGC census, 1 on the CBCS census. A Gerber 8.

Post 43 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by circumstances
Funny Picture Stories #4, February, 1937. 7 universal on the CGC census, 1 on the CBCS census. A Gerber 8.

Sweet early Centaurs from the pre Centaur days buddy. Love your collection!
Post 44 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Quote:
Originally Posted by circumstances
Funny Picture Stories #4, February, 1937. 7 universal on the CGC census, 1 on the CBCS census. A Gerber 8.

Sweet early Centaurs from the pre Centaur days buddy. Love your collection!


I love them too!

Thanks!
Post 45 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Last issue of this series. Seemed most of their self titled Hero books came to a close at the end of '40 except for Arrow if i'm right.
Post 46 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Last issue of this series. Seemed most of their self titled Hero books came to a close at the end of '40 except for Arrow if i'm right.


Weirdly Arrow #1 and 2 were October and November of 1940.

Then #3 is October of 1941.

I hope the story in #2 didn't continue in #3 (a year later), lol.
Post 47 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@Sagii Wow. And without internet or fanzines back then tp inform them of the status, a kid probably just gave up looking forward to it by the time #3 showed up.
Post 48 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
..How could i forget: Amazing-Man also ran past 1940
Post 49 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Funny Pages Vol. 3 #4. June, 1939. Jack Cole World's Fair Cover. Gustavson Arrow story. 5 copies on the CGC census, zero on the CBCS.


Post 50 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by circumstances
Funny Pages Vol. 3 #4. June, 1939. Jack Cole World's Fair Cover. Gustavson Arrow story. 5 copies on the CGC census, zero on the CBCS.


Cool rarity there! Some stellar results on Amazing Mystery Funnies auctioned off on ComicConnect last night! Centaurs are hot!
Post 51 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
Quote:
Originally Posted by circumstances
Funny Pages Vol. 3 #4. June, 1939. Jack Cole World's Fair Cover. Gustavson Arrow story. 5 copies on the CGC census, zero on the CBCS.


Cool rarity there! Some stellar results on Amazing Mystery Funnies auctioned off on ComicConnect last night! Centaurs are hot!


Really? I wasn't aware.
Post 52 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@circumstances Yes, they were Jon Berk copies, that fetched significantly more this go round than the initial auction back in 2017.
Post 53 IP   flag post
Collector circumstances private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagii
@circumstances Yes, they were Jon Berk copies, that fetched significantly more this go round than the initial auction back in 2017.


Sweet.

Was it a large selection, or just a few late run AMFs?
Post 54 IP   flag post
Collector Sagii private msg quote post Address this user
@circumstances A few AMF's . Tonight is the Church copy of Detective Eye #1 i believe.
Post 55 IP   flag post
319066 90 30
Log in or sign up to compose a reply.