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Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
I rarely bid on eBay any more. I usually just go for the BINs or Make an Offer. A listing popped up for a book that very few people would be interested in given the grade, so I went ahead and placed a bid. In less than a day, I was out bid. No big deal.

It did make me wonder who out bid me. So, I pulled the other bidders bidding history and saw this:


30-Day Summary
Total bids: 497
Items bid on: 447
Bid activity (%) with this seller: 0% Help
Bid retractions: 4
Bid retractions (6 months): 27



What caught my attention was 27 bid retractions in the past 6 months. I have been an eBay member since: April 21, 1999, and I have never retracted a bid that I can remember. Is it just me or does that seem odd?
Post 1 IP   flag post
Collector GanaSoth private msg quote post Address this user
@DrWatson could be shill bidding? Maybe a few friends boosting each other's auctions? Ask FeeBay to take a closer look into it & give your reasons for your concerns.
Post 2 IP   flag post
Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
It's not that big of a deal. If it is in fact a "friend" bidding on the auction, I would rather he "win" the book than have it myself at this point.
Post 3 IP   flag post
Collector Scifinator private msg quote post Address this user
5% of bids retracted does seem to be a lot. Maybe a lot of drunk bidding followed by regret retractions.
Post 4 IP   flag post
TRA LA LA esaravo private msg quote post Address this user
@DrWatson - Something fishy is definitely going on. I have had several sellers abruptly end auctions before they were supposed to end (because the winning bids were too low), but I have never retracted a bid myself.
Post 5 IP   flag post
Collector andy49 private msg quote post Address this user
some people want to know what the current maximum bid is, so they'll bid until they're the high bidder, then retract their bid

ebay should ban these people
Post 6 IP   flag post
Collector GanaSoth private msg quote post Address this user
@andy49 here here!
Post 7 IP   flag post
Collector chester15 private msg quote post Address this user
Totally agree with @andy49. High levels of bidding and retracting are a definite sign of foul play, or incompetence. Either way, retractions over a certain VERY LOW %, people should be banned or sit in the penalty box for a specific period. If you can't do it right, don't do it at all.
Post 8 IP   flag post
Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
I've retracted a bid or two....27 bids in 6 months seems like alot but look at his 30 day bid count; 497.

if that's an average then he's placed 2982 bids in 6 months and retracted 27 of them. That's less than 1%...not that big a deal.
Post 9 IP   flag post
Collector Nelsconey private msg quote post Address this user
As someone who sells a lot of vg's. It's just as annoying or more when buyers refuse to pay for stuff after winning. Just disappear.
Post 10 IP   flag post
Collector chester15 private msg quote post Address this user
497 bids in 30 days is lot, especially since it says 447 items bid on. So not much over 1 bid per item, but that's a pile of items, 16 per day, every day, on average. Full time job.

Could be someone who places bids on multiple auctions for the same item. Then wins one, and has to retract the upcoming bids so as to get only 1. There are better ways to do that, such a sniping tool that has "bid groups". When 1 hits, the other snipes in that group are pulled off the schedule, no harm done.
Post 11 IP   flag post
Collector EbaySeller private msg quote post Address this user
@andy49 thanks for the explanation I had never thought of. If sellers can take down auctions after they've started, then I guess bidders can retract their bids with impunity. If sellers can use their auctions to "feel out" the market, then I guess buyers can use their bids for the same purpose. Sounds pretty loosy-goosy to me, but I guess Ebay will make the rules based on what is best for their marketplace.
Post 12 IP   flag post
Collector Drogio private msg quote post Address this user
I’d think I’ve retracted maybe one bid in 20 years on eBay.

4 in one month and 27 in six months seems crazy to me. Guy takes advantage of the system, should be reprimanded. I assume eBay has a way to electronically track these things?
Post 13 IP   flag post
Collector etapi65 private msg quote post Address this user
Ebay won't do anything. I lost two auctions in one night for keys. Noticed I was outbid by the same bidder. Saw both items repost and got the "do you want a second chance notice". Did a little research; it was the same seller for both items under two different user names, they were unhappy with the max bid, so they had someone "win" both auctions and then repost (or it could have been the same person again with a 3rd account). I reported to ebay, nothing ever happened. They don't care, they're making money. Just offer the max you're willing to offer, or; take what you're willing to take and move on. NO ONE is looking out for the consumers.
Post 14 IP   flag post
Collector chester15 private msg quote post Address this user
EBay is useless regarding policing. You can report over and over, and it won't matter. Like talking to a wall. As soon as I see odd things going on in an auction I have bid on, I get out of it. It's now tainted. That is the only time I will retract a bid.

Someone bids you up just past your max bid, and then retracts their bid. This reveals, momentarily, your max bid. But when they retract, your original lower winning bid goes back in place. Then another bidder comes in and "coincidentally" bids just below your max and stops, so now your max comes in as an actual bid, and the seller is extracting as much $$$ as possible from you. That is why I get out of those tainted auctions. Just because you have been outbid doesn't mean you are safe. Your bid can reappear, as just explained, so get out. This happens quite often on items of substantial value.

Another thing that happens is the "error" listing. After you place your bid, the seller closes the auction due to an "error", and re-posts. On the closed "error" listing, if you look at the bids placed report, your maximum bid will show. So now the seller knows what you were willing to pay, and after you place your bid on the new auction, can confidently have someone bid you up to just below that "secret" amount. I have complained to eBay about this practice of showing the max bids, but again useless. They don't show your max bid on auctions you win, just when you lose to a better bid. So why show them on the error listings?

Don't fall for these things, and let the seller know you have reported them and that you are wise to what they are doing. The reporting will do no good, but maybe they don't know that. They think no one is catching on, but you will make them stop and think for a moment before trying it again.
Post 15 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
I’ve never had a serious problem with eBay as a buyer or seller, but I’m constantly reminded that issues exist and have witnessed scamming and other suspicious activities. You always have to have your guard up. If your Spidey sense is tingling, there’s usually a reason for it.

Perhaps I’ve just been lucky. My biggest eBay bidding grievance to date occurred a couple of years back and involved the purchase of a rare signed lobby card. Purchased around the first of December it was intended as a holiday gift. The seller was running multiple auctions at the time and had a lengthy positive feedback score. So I felt good about bidding and confident of the item arriving in a timely manner.

Alas, upon winning the item, the seller somehow mixed up addresses and shipped my purchase to another customer while sending me her win. Granted, this was a rookie mistake that a seasoned eBay seller should never make, but it was still fixable. Unfortunately, the situation quickly devolved, turning into a comedy of errors.

In a panic the seller contacted me, asking if I’d be satisfied with the item she’d won as an alternative since in theory it was more valuable than the item I purchased. He apologized profusely and pleaded with me, promising a free selection from his listings if I accepted. After giving this some thought I agreed, thinking this was an equitable resolution to the matter.

But shortly after this I received another panicked communication from the seller that his other customer was outraged at not receiving what she’d won and wouldn’t be satisfied with a refund or alternative. He was shaken by this and his temperament now changed from conciliatory to confrontational.

What followed was a bad, almost comical, confrontation where the seller ...feeling pressured from his other customer... said I had to exchange the mis-shipped item with his other customer immediately. That sent my Spidey sense to tingling. I told him that I wouldn’t send anything to a third party. Then he threatened me with an eBay rules sanction if I failed to ship the item back.

I politely reminded him that this was his mistake, not mine, and I’d gladly send the item back to him, but not to his other customer or on his schedule. The caveat was that it would ship after the holiday season and only if it was back to him. I also reminded him that the lobby card I’d paid for was intended as a holiday gift that failed to arrive on time.

Accepting this as the inevitable outcome, his tone reverted back to friendly. Everything did work out in the long run and I received what I’d originally won, but two months late. It wasn’t without some financial risk since it required my trusting he’d send the original purchase, but it worked out in spite of the hassle.

Afterwards, I never heard from the seller again, even after I’d helped him correct an inconvenient situation with his other customer. So, in retrospect, it wasn’t the greatest experience. My takeaway from this incident was no matter how responsible you are toward other buyers and sellers eBay dealing is always a crapshoot.

Post 16 IP   flag post
Collector 00slim private msg quote post Address this user
Very fishy indeed. Seems to be a shill account, IMO.

If the book is not particularly rare, just obscure, I’d send a heads up to e-bay and walk away.

Maybe they’ll do something, maybe they won’t. But, until someone sounds an alarm, they’ll be unaware. Maybe they’ll listen to the next guy once a pattern of behavior is established from their point-of-view.

That’s my two cents, anyway. I can’t stand dishonesty in the collectibles market.
Post 17 IP   flag post
Collector the420bandito private msg quote post Address this user
That's the funny thing about ebay. The rules seem very loose. My buddy always causes trouble on there and he says he just opens another account and keeps on swinging. I sold a good amount of books on there last year but I am kind of over it. I decided to start sending my books to ComicConnect. Let them deal with all the headaches for me.
Post 18 IP   flag post
Collector EbaySeller private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by chester15
Someone bids you up just past your max bid, and then retracts their bid. This reveals, momentarily, your max bid. But when they retract, your original lower winning bid goes back in place. Then another bidder comes in and "coincidentally" bids just below your max and stops, so now your max comes in as an actual bid, and the seller is extracting as much $$$ as possible from you.


You guys are bringing up scams that are so obvious but I had never thought about them. I appreciate the education. I wish Ebay would offer the seller an option of "No Cancellation, No bid retractions" when they choose to auction a collectible. That would even things out for the buyer and seller. I'm guessing that auctions are probably becoming less and less important to Ebay and it's been morphing for years into a Buy it Now platform. I'm not sure how much they even care about auction integrity at this point.
Post 19 IP   flag post
Collector Paulbg2000 private msg quote post Address this user
I have done bid retractions commonly, but mostly it's on "Make an Offer" and then I find something else in the meantime so retract it...I wouldn't say that's in bad taste (some may disagree) because it's an offer and not a firm bid...
Post 20 IP   flag post
Collector 00slim private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paulbg2000
I have done bid retractions commonly, but mostly it's on "Make an Offer" and then I find something else in the meantime so retract it...I wouldn't say that's in bad taste (some may disagree) because it's an offer and not a firm bid...


The fine print on best offers suggests it’s a contracted promise to pay the amount offered if the offer is accepted. It’s essentially the same as a bid.

Bid & offer retractions are a safety net in case you see a flaw or something you missed when initially considering the purchase.

That’s my understanding, anyway.
Post 21 IP   flag post
Collector chester15 private msg quote post Address this user
It's only an impression I get, but eBay seems to not be as concerned on offers. As memory serves, as soon as you make an offer, when the confirmation box comes up, it says something like this: "Change your mind? You can retract your offer." It's in small print. And the 2nd sentence is a link to do just that. Take a look next time you make an offer. I'm not sure if that was there as a test, or SOP now. It's eBay - in the blink of an eye it will change.

Offers are a bit looser anyway. The seller doesn't have to respond immediately. They can accept, decline, or counter-offer within the given time period, which is also variable. The item may sell on a Buy-It-Now during the negotiations or while an offer is pending. Multiple offers can be in play at the same time. Offers on eBay is whole different world.
Post 22 IP   flag post
Collector 00slim private msg quote post Address this user



Upon submitting an offer, I don’t see any mention of the retraction option.

I think they want people to take their offers seriously. That’s all in saying, really.
Post 23 IP   flag post
Collector chester15 private msg quote post Address this user
You won't see the link to retract until AFTER you make the offer. It's in the confirmation box, as I mentioned. If it appears at all, that is. I know it used to, but it could have been a trial. As recently as a month ago I could see it in the box. Also, I am referring to desktop browsers. Mobile can be very different.

The statement in the photo "you are agreeing to purchase this item if the seller accepts your offer" is weighty, but the key word is "IF". By retracting your offer, there is nothing to accept. So you made an offer, retracted it, supposedly no harm no foul. The seller didn't lose anything, just saw that someone offered then changed their mind. Could be for a handful of reasons.

Unlike auction bids, where you are interacting with other bidders to determine an outcome. You could mess people up there. If I am bidding on an item, and get outbid, I might search again for another item. Maybe another auction, or just buy a fixed price item. Then the overbid is retracted, and my bid is on the hook for an item I thought was dead and buried. That could be a major problem.
Post 24 IP   flag post
Collector 00slim private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by chester15
You won't see the link to retract until AFTER you make the offer. It's in the confirmation box, as I mentioned. If it appears at all, that is. I know it used to, but it could have been a trial. As recently as a month ago I could see it in the box. Also, I am referring to desktop browsers. Mobile can be very different.

The statement in the photo "you are agreeing to purchase this item if the seller accepts your offer" is weighty, but the key word is "IF". By retracting your offer, there is nothing to accept. So you made an offer, retracted it, supposedly no harm no foul. The seller didn't lose anything, just saw that someone offered then changed their mind. Could be for a handful of reasons.

Unlike auction bids, where you are interacting with other bidders to determine an outcome. You could mess people up there. If I am bidding on an item, and get outbid, I might search again for another item. Maybe another auction, or just buy a fixed price item. Then the overbid is retracted, and my bid is on the hook for an item I thought was dead and buried. That could be a major problem.


But You’re committing to buy upon submission is my point. This is the confirmation page.

Retraction shows up as an option after you’ve committed, sure & there are circumstances for retraction.

I’m simply suggesting people take their offers seriously. Weigh the book in comparison to others and consider your offer seriously before submitting it.
Post 25 IP   flag post
Collector chester15 private msg quote post Address this user
Maybe I am using the wrong term "confirmation box". I should say "acknowledgement box", that you get AFTER you hit Submit.

You are correct that the photo is the confirmation box regarding the parameters of your offer, ready to submit, obligated upon submittal.

I remember thinking it odd that when the acknowledgement came back to verify that your offer was placed, within it was the message I initially mentioned, a means baked right in to retract it. I noticed it because it was new to that dialogue box. EBay sticking its nose in there.

EBay will now also "suggest" that your offer is too low as you are typing it in, telling you what the trending price is. When the offer is presented to the seller, eBay highlights the button THEY think should be pushed (accept, decline, counter-offer) based on the supposed merit of the offer. Like they know anything.

Fully agree that people should take their offers seriously. I was just pointing out that eBay seems to look at the offer vs. the bid with different standards.
Post 26 IP   flag post
Collector Scifinator private msg quote post Address this user
I want to retract my comment from above.....Oh, d@mn!+, this is the CBCS forum not eBay.
Post 27 IP   flag post
Collector EbaySeller private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paulbg2000
I have done bid retractions commonly, but mostly it's on "Make an Offer" and then I find something else in the meantime so retract it...I wouldn't say that's in bad taste (some may disagree) because it's an offer and not a firm bid...


@Paulbg2000 It is absolutely OK to retract offers before they are accepted. If it were not, sellers would have no incentive to reply to your offer quickly. Without the retraction option, sellers by all rights should wait 48 hours and see if they can get a better offer or use your offer to leverage other potential buyers. The retraction option makes it risky for sellers to delay response while they try to use your offer as a tool.
Post 28 IP   flag post
Collector Gabriel85301 private msg quote post Address this user
I have no idea how to retract a bid or I just don't have that option available to me.
Post 29 IP   flag post
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