Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »
CBCS Comics
Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »
Collector martymann private msg quote post Address this user
While the quality and quantity of my collection does not meet
any standards, I did enjoy posting scans of my comics bought
off the newsstand between the years of 1942 to 1954.
It was my pleasure to let the collecting community know that
they existed and I have truly enjoyed the kind comments I have
received.

Marty
Post 26 IP   flag post
Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncross
Quote:
Originally Posted by the420bandito
Quote:
Originally Posted by Studley_Dudley
I have no doubt about that. I think Marty addressed that in one of his Park Avenue posts. Who determines a pedigree though? Is it CGC or CBCS or Bobby Overstreet or Doug Sulipa or who? It's agreed upon that there are criteria that must be met, but then what?


They claim the collecting community decides but nowadays CGC (and maybe to a lesser degree CBCS) now makes that determination.


That's what happens nowadays

One of the reasons for that is because when these large collections are discovered now, everyone wants to know how they will grade out and contact the cgc or CBCS to get a handle on the value.
Post 27 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR Studley_Dudley private msg quote post Address this user
Speaking of pedigrees...
Post 28 IP   flag post
Collector the420bandito private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Studley_Dudley
Speaking of pedigrees...

I thought that it would go for more honestly. Such a cool rare book.
Post 29 IP   flag post
Collector Arak private msg quote post Address this user
*&(&^$E^*#*^$R)*^(Y&+*+)*+)_U N(UUGLPI
Just chaps my @$$ to spend almost an hour gathering thoughts and slowly typing them out with these beat up ham hock hands of mine , to suddenly, accidentally hit the back button getting up for a drink and lose everything...Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr
2nd much shorter version. It bothers me that in my 25 year hiatus a third party company says that they control what was traditionally decided by the community. This is not me attacking CBCS or CGC . This is me wondering when did we forget that someone can only take what you allow them to take. in my 20 year hiatus , How did a company that exists to provide a service ... to serve!!! start dictating what will and will not be? remember ...when good men do nothing. I am certainly not saying that CGC is evil, however I can understand why so many old timers question if they may have gotten a little too big for their britches. and even some grumble if they were and are needed anyway.Some liken the company to the diamond industry

That's here nor there... but let me tell you something. If we got together as a large group and proclaimed that the Studly Dudly B.A. Pedigree exists. that tomorrow the rest of the comic community started you tubing discussions about it. the comic book men had Stud on the show. and everyone as a whole accepted the pedigree ... that a grading company could stop it * are you frigging kidding me?* not a chance.
to quote King's gunslinger " Maybe we have forgotten the face of our fathers"
Studly wants a collection or pedigree. ask the community , since that is where the decision was and that is where it belongs.
*steps down off soapbox*
Post 30 IP   flag post


Collector bythegram private msg quote post Address this user
I'm curious if there is a list of all the recognized "collections" on CGC? I found this list of pedigrees https://www.cgccomics.com/resources/pedigree/ but haven't had the same luck on collections.

Any ideas?
Post 31 IP   flag post
Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Some of the collections were lumped in with the pedigrees.
Post 32 IP   flag post
Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
*Steps up on the Soap box*

While I can certainly understand a "notation" for a book coming from a famous celebrity collection and such, but to me these pedigrees are bullshit marketing ploys used by auction houses to extract higher premiums.

The origins of the book are irrelevant to me. How well the book presents and the strength of the grade is all that matters to me.

While I can understand the allure some of the more famous pedigrees have to people (Edgar Church etc..) I have no interest in a graded book with somebody else's name on the label.

*Preparing to take flak!*
Post 33 IP   flag post
Collector gmellos private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944
*Steps up on the Soap box*

While I can certainly understand a "notation" for a book coming from a famous celebrity collection and such, but to me these pedigrees are bullshit marketing ploys used by auction houses to extract higher premiums.

The origins of the book are irrelevant to me. How well the book presents and the strength of the grade is all that matters to me.

While I can understand the allure some of the more famous pedigrees have to people (Edgar Church etc..) I have no interest in a graded book with somebody else's name on the label.

*Preparing to take flak!*


Preach Brother Preach
Post 34 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944
*Steps up on the Soap box*

While I can certainly understand a "notation" for a book coming from a famous celebrity collection and such, but to me these pedigrees are bullshit marketing ploys used by auction houses to extract higher premiums.

The origins of the book are irrelevant to me. How well the book presents and the strength of the grade is all that matters to me.

While I can understand the allure some of the more famous pedigrees have to people (Edgar Church etc..) I have no interest in a graded book with somebody else's name on the label.

*Preparing to take flak!*


No flak, but it boils down to whether you care about the history of a given original owner collection or not. It's easy to make a case for provenance being an important tool to track the history of sales for any high grade collectible. But taking that a step further, pedigrees add another layer of interest by providing compelling personal histories of owners. This is especially true for GA books.

Also, comic pedigrees were established over forty years ago, long before substantial sales through auction houses, much less third party grading service involvement in determining book heritage.

In the case of one vintage pedigree parents continued to buy and carefully store their son's favorite comics while he was serving overseas in WWII, awaiting his return home which never happened. The full story is still a mystery, but it's fascinating. The fact that the books were all but forgotten until being rediscovered and sold, just adds another level of intrigue to the history of these books. It makes collectors like me want to know more, not less.

Edgar Church was a commercial artist who amassed a huge collection of comics as an older adult purely for reference purposes. The amazing degree of preservation is part of this pedigree's story. Each collector's tale is unique and many folks are curious about the stories behind these books. That said, you're right that mileage varies on the value of pedigree status. Personally, I think it's a big plus. Who knows, maybe one day we'll see a HC book devoted to comic pedigrees, but I'm not holding my breath on that one.
.
Post 35 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Breaking News: While perusing the CGC board I learned that CGC have settled on a brushed gold label for pedigree designated books. Their label still retains the aesthetically unappealing “billboard” grade box, but the new label seems apropos.
.
Post 36 IP   flag post
Collector southerncross private msg quote post Address this user
Yep and I voted for the silver label. I think the gold distracts myself
Post 37 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncross
Yep and I voted for the silver label. I think the gold distracts myself


I don’t consider the brushed gold distracting at all, certainly no where near as distracting as an oversized neon white grade box with heavy black grade, but opinions vary.

My feeling about the silver is that it’s bland to the point of being uninteresting. Keep in mind I was fine with the traditional blue label and simple pedigree designation, but brushed gold seems apropos, entirely logical for the special nature of pedigrees.

Now if CGC management could just figure out how to eliminate all Newton Rings and pressure related problems with encapsulation. These are genuinely serious issues that affect both visual perception and prolonged condition of books in storage.
Post 38 IP   flag post
Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Is there a picture?
Post 39 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrWatson
Is there a picture?


You be the judge...


Post 40 IP   flag post
Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
I was expecting... more.
Post 41 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrWatson
I was expecting... more.


The test will be whether folks say this after consigned books are auctioned.
.
Post 42 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR Studley_Dudley private msg quote post Address this user
I didn't mind the silver and black Oakland Raiders color scheme. The brushed gold just doesn't pop as much to me.
Post 43 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR Towmater private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944


The origins of the book are irrelevant to me. How well the book presents and the strength of the grade is all that matters to me.


+1

Sure, some great stories may surround a collection but at the end of the day I don't care that Timmy had to walk 12 miles in the snow to get his comic every week. More than likely the collection will be sold off and split in to smaller parts when Timmy dies and his children sell it off. The children care about the stories but more than likely the same interest mileage on those stories won't be found in the next owner. Does the new owner really care if the trek Timmy took through the snow was 12 inches vs 5 inches?
Post 44 IP   flag post
Collector Darkseid_of_town private msg quote post Address this user
People also kinda miss the point that knowing the pedigree of a book helps you know what it was subjected to, or if it was marked in some way inside or stored a given way for years. Those things all can/may affect how you handle or view it in your own collection.

By example I can tell you I own one pedigree book...it sold quite cheaply at auction and I was surprised when I won it...it is the White Mountain copy of TOS 99...and when you hold the book in your hand its gorgeous...the colors are deep and solid, the book is flat, and has basically no color breaks.
However.....
Once you flip it over, you notice on the back cover in the margin...someone wrote.....1.50
2.50
1.50
______
5.50

So either the owner of one of the better pedigree collections ever to surface could not add 5.50 in his head or someone who owned what was known to be a pedigree book, chose to use it for scratch paper.

Doing some research I think I came to the conclusion this was done by the original owner, as it was late in his collection when he might have felt the comic was basically rather modern , and held little value. I like knowing its the white mountain copy, and that it may even have been written on by the original owner...it helps me know what I have.

It holds the spot in my TOS run for this issue...BUT if I just took the book on its own merits it would have been replaced in the run due to the writing...but since its a pedigree book I chose to leave it in my set.

Post 45 IP   flag post
Collector southerncross private msg quote post Address this user
I'm with CatmanAmerica when it comes to pedigrees. I love the stories behind the books. They add extra fun in collecting.
For example I have two Oakland copies. The story from this collection was a kid that collected everything in the late 60s-70s. He even bought romance books. He arranged with the shop where he bought his books that he'd come in and put the new books out on the shelf in exchange for first able to buy them.
So he was buying before they hit the spinner racks. When he read them he placed a clean towel underneath and always supported the book while he did it. And he never loaned out or traded with kids in his neighborhood.
What I find amazing is his age at the time when he bought and read his books going off the information from the overstreet update when the collection was found.

He was 7 when he aqquired this book




And he was 9 when he got this




Myself there is no way at that age I'd be able to keep a book in that condition
Post 46 IP   flag post
Collector southerncross private msg quote post Address this user
And another thing I love about pedigrees or books from a collection especially from the 60s to the 70s they don't sell for a premium as a lot of collectors don't chase them.
I've picked up all mine at the same price as a non pedigree at the same grade. And at times less.
An example is the Jimmy Olsen first Darkseid
I've been wanting a copy any nice copy for a few years now.
And just this year I picked up the Murphy Anderson file copy in 9.0
Here is gp as of the book and the prices realized for a non pedigree in the same 9.0 range. I think I did alright and at the end of the day I finally got a copy of Darkseid


Post 47 IP   flag post
Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncross
And another thing I love about pedigrees or books from a collection especially from the 60s to the 70s they don't sell for a premium as a lot of collectors don't chase them.

Hmm...
Post 48 IP   flag post
274395 48 23
Log in or sign up to compose a reply.
destitute