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Disney Possibly Buying Fox4754

Collector DocBrown private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by CaptainCanuck
@DocBrown

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Originally Posted by DocBrown
I wonder what Disney really wants in this deal. It isn't the X-Men, much as comics fans might wish that were the case. There's something...or several things...that Disney wants that are much more valuable.


You don’t have to wonder. Disney wants Hulu so they can compete with Netflix.

It’s not a secret.


Yeah, that's what I suspected, going over the list of assets that was supposed to be included in the deal. From the link above:

"The deal contemplates the sale of Fox's Nat Geo, Star, regional sports networks, movie studios and stakes in Sky and Hulu, among other properties. What would remain at Fox includes its news and business news divisions, broadcast network and Fox sports."

So is there published confirmation of this?
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Collector DocBrown private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by Lonestar
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Originally Posted by DocBrown
Disney won't be allowed to buy up all their competitors in the entertainment industry. At some point, the anti-trust laws will kick in.

I wonder what Disney really wants in this deal. It isn't the X-Men, much as comics fans might wish that were the case. There's something...or several things...that Disney wants that are much more valuable.

More content for streaming service. Streaming is the future of TV viewing. Disney is set to launch its streaming service in 2019. All the networks and cable channels are scrambling to find a way to survive in what will be the new future that isn't far off.

We already have Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime, not to mention the separate streaming services for HBO, etc. And even things like Acorn. Now you have others jumping into it like YouTube and the rumor of Apple launching its own streaming service. CBS put the new Star Trek on their own streaming. More will follow.

So Disney needs more content to make their streaming service attractive enough to pull viewers away from the established services or to make people want to buy their service as well.


I can't even pretend to understand the ins and outs of "streaming." I guess it's a big thing? Seems to be a return to what TV already was: instant and universal broadcasts of programming, only, instead of that broadcast being in the form of radio waves sent over the air, it's now in the form of digital bits and bytes sent digitally...which, since the digital switch in 2009, seems to mean there's no difference at all in the technology.

Do I have that about right...?

There was a certain social construct in the Western world revolving around the set time schedules of broadcast television, which seems now to have vanished, what with there being no more "schedule" (prime time is now a thing of the past...?), and content being "dumped" for entire "seasons" on one specific date.

Whereas, in 1980, everyone in America gathered around their TV set to see who shot JR, now there are hundreds, if not thousands, of competing programs, available when the viewer demands it.

Can anyone explain what "streaming" really is, as opposed to just "viewing"? My limited understanding is that the idea of "streaming" is "live TV", like the news or a sporting event, as opposed to a "show" that is taped and then released on various platforms.

Is there more to it than that?
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COLLECTOR shrewbeer private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by DocBrown
Is there more to it than that?


Yes, you watch what you want, when you want it. No need to pay $100s of dollars to a cable company for "all" the channels, when you can pick up what you want when you want it instead.

a la carte

I don't have cable. I have 4 different streaming services to pick from on my TV, and I can pick up or drop any of them at any given time if they do or don't have something I want to watch. Best of all, all told I'm under $50/month.

If Disney gets Hulu... That will be huge. Yuge.
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Collector Scorpion private msg quote post Address this user
first of all streaming is cheaper then cable, i had cable & internet and was paying almost $160 for this,
now cable is $60 +Netflix 10.00 & play-station VUE live tv $30= $100

and not locked in to 2 year contract with the cable co. so now am saving $60.00 a month $720 year saving, that why streaming is big, no contract.
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Collector thelastbard private msg quote post Address this user
@DocBrown Streaming is two things...

1. Content available to view any time you want using a certain platform. In this case, Disney has their own proprietary "channel" available on a device - Roku, Amazon Fire, web-based, PS4, X-Box One, etc...
2. Content available at certain times - New season is available all at once as of X time or new episodes available on X days at X time or X episodes (certain number of episodes at a time) available at a certain time...

As @shewbeer is saying, a la carte television is the aim...

I want disney, I want HBO, I want Fox, etc... Over time, a la carte WILL be the way to go and more and more places will offer live tv options, too, regionally, nationally, and internationally.

Right now, streaming is more about general content - past tv and movies PLUS new, original content to STREAM (buffer and watch real time) as opposed to downloading to your PC.
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Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
Streaming is all about viewer control. You watch what you want when you want.
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Collector thelastbard private msg quote post Address this user
The challenge is that places like Hulu want to be a one-stop-shop replacement for cable... or as close as they can be. They want to offer past shows (full seasons of shows), old and newer movies, allow you to "plug in" HBO and other premium channels with an upgrade, "plug in" live tv with an upgrade, etc... But, by companies like Disney, CBS, and others pulling out their content, it makes it that much more difficult.

Hulu can get all except...
Netflix can provide a ton of TV and movie content except...
Amazon prime can provide a ton of TV and movie content except...

But, it's all AWESOME!!! So much great original content coming out on streaming services, and you can watch shows within a day (or less) after they were on broadcast TV... why not?

A lot of cable providers also offer streaming options, too, so you don't even have to turn on your cable box - just stream the channels instead - go figure.
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Collector OrbitCityComics private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by BabaLament
Does anyone have any information as to how the comics side of this deal is going to play out? Is Dark Horse going to lose their licenses to Marvel (again) once Disney takes ownership of the Fox properties?


It means that Deadpool is now only going to appear in family friendly PG13 movies.
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Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by OrbitCityComics
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Originally Posted by BabaLament
Does anyone have any information as to how the comics side of this deal is going to play out? Is Dark Horse going to lose their licenses to Marvel (again) once Disney takes ownership of the Fox properties?


It means that Deadpool is now only going to appear in family friendly PG13 movies.


@OrbitCityComics

I don't think that will happen. From a business point of view it doesn't make sense to buy something that targets a different market segment only to change that thing to appeal to a market you already dominate in. I believe one of the main reasons why Disney would want Deadpool is to have a presence in that different market segment and build on it. Deadpool has proven lucrative in the R market.
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Collector DocBrown private msg quote post Address this user
So, streaming has nothing to do with technology, and everything to do with availability, which is what I said here:

"Whereas, in 1980, everyone in America gathered around their TV set to see who shot JR, now there are hundreds, if not thousands, of competing programs, available when the viewer demands it."

Hey, guess I did understand it after all.
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Collector Lonestar private msg quote post Address this user
A few have mentioned a la carte TV. We are seeing something like that, both via cable and streaming, with "skinny bundles". If you haven't already heard this term, you will be hearing it more and more in the near future.

Basically, doing away with the large or fat bundles of current cable TV with 100 or more stations. And it's making small or skinny bundles of a few stations that are alike for a smaller fee.

This linked article has some examples of this.

clickable text

What you will see is streaming services that are like these skinny bundles as various companies buy up other networks or channels to create a certain amount of content that will be exclusive to them.

That is what I think Disney is doing. Trying to get enough good content that will make their new streaming service to be viable. Imagine if they have a streaming service that has all the Disney content, all ABC shows (past and present), all shows from FX, all Marvel content, all Star Wars. That would be a fairly attractive bundle of content.
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Collector DocBrown private msg quote post Address this user
There was a monstrous push by film studios in the 70's to ban, or severely restrict, the sales of VCRs and other home viewing equipment.

They were afraid that, if people could watch movies at home, no one would go to movie theatres.

That was a spectacular example of how utterly incorrect even the "experts" can be.

Who would have foreseen that in 2015, there would be not 1, not 2, but FIVE films that broke the $1,000,000,000 box office barrier worldwide...?
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Collector thelastbard private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by DocBrown
There was a monstrous push by film studios in the 70's to ban, or severely restrict, the sales of VCRs and other home viewing equipment.

They were afraid that, if people could watch movies at home, no one would go to movie theatres.

That was a spectacular example of how utterly incorrect even the "experts" can be.

Who would have foreseen that in 2015, there would be not 1, not 2, but FIVE films that broke the $1,000,000,000 box office barrier worldwide...?


It's rarely a matter of stopping, but controlling and monetizing... That's what companies needed to learn. Free digital copies with blu-ray purchases, digital options, digital music purchasing or free with CD purchases (or even with vinyl), digital with print comics, stream cable from your current provider, so they can "train" you for the inevitable end of today's business model...
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Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
Quick question.....isn't the TV show Gotham on the Fox Network? My understanding is the Fox network is part of the sale (can anyone confirm this?). If that's true, would Disney now own the Gotham show?
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Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
and more so... how did Fox get to produce/distribute the Gotham show to begin with? Warner Brothers has a TV network do they not, the WB is Warner Brothers network isn't it?
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Collector thelastbard private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by GAC
and more so... how did Fox get to produce/distribute the Gotham show to begin with? Warner Brothers has a TV network do they not, the WB is Warner Brothers network isn't it?


No, WB still owns it... production companies produce shows all the time that air on other networks. Things are just murkier these days, since everyone is buying everyone else up. Fox NETWORK will still be owned by what is left AFTER the deal, though... Not Disney.
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Collector DocBrown private msg quote post Address this user
Television studios "cross produce" other networks' shows all the time. For example, the Amazing Race is co-produced by ABC and CBS.
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Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
hmm...interesting! Thanks thelastbard & DocBrown!

I knew TV shows jumped networks but I thought that was exclusively when the show was in re-runs/syndication and no longer producing new episodes. Cool to know..thanks!!
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Collector BabaLament private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by GAC
I knew TV shows jumped networks but I thought that was exclusively when the show was in re-runs/syndication and no longer producing new episodes.


It happens during production runs too, if/when a show has to bounce around different networks in order to stay alive. A great example would be Babylon 5. It was originally run on a bastardized co-op network that, due to mergers between companies w/ different priorities, never really supported the show. The writers room did really good work on that show, the plot stands up pretty well today; but they never had a network willing to kick in towards the production budget, and it shows. Once all the dust settled, the show was brought in-house to TNT, but by that time the show was in its final season & being wound-down.

So, with that in mind, if there are any programs out there that are a Fox-partnership, depending on popularity and Disney's willingness to play nice/share (insert laughter here), they probably have "Series Finale" in their future.
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COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user
Looks like it's a done deal. Signed as of today, 12/8/17
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Collector thelastbard private msg quote post Address this user
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Originally Posted by kaptainmyke
Looks like it's a done deal. Signed as of today, 12/8/17


Is it that international business news site you're looking at, or a reputable US site?

Here are the closest real reports... The site I found that is saying the deal is done is referencing an article saying "close" from days ago and "by Christmas."

The below is what other sites are using to say Fox and Disney are working out "their fine print."

http://variety.com/2017/biz/news/disney-fox-goldman-sachs-centerview-jp-morgan-guggenheim-partners-1202634210/
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Streaming is just a continual flow of data. Streaming video is a continual flow of data packets to the user. You get what you want when you want.

Off topic:
Radio waves can broadcast digital signals. My dad installed the first IBOC (In band on Channel) AM broadcast system in Atlanta over 10 years ago. I think the technology had too many bugs and no one bought the receivers. Digital AM stereo is out there.

https://www.fcc.gov/media/radio/digital-radio

After reading that, I remember that it was a hybrid signal. The stations had to broadcast a normal radio signal too meet FCC requirements, but there was a subcarrier or such that carried the digital packets.
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Collector Scorpion private msg quote post Address this user
Disney and 21st Century Fox Deal to Reportedly Close on Thursday

Well, it looks like the deal is actually going to happen.

According to a new report from CNBC, the deal for Disney to buy 21st Century Fox is all-but complete, and that the companies are set to announce the acquisition on Thursday.

clickable text
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Collector thelastbard private msg quote post Address this user
Once Comcast dropped out yesterday, things had to start moving a bit easier...
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