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Collector Watcher private msg quote post Address this user
..
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Collector Masochism private msg quote post Address this user
Hey bud let's keep it on the Secret Santa thread eh?
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Collector Watcher private msg quote post Address this user
I can do that
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user

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Moderator Jesse_O private msg quote post Address this user
@X51 I can still hear the dial-up connection in my head!!!

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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
I remember the days of accessing a text message board using a Bell & Howell branded Apple II Plus with a 300 baud modem. Simple was still cool back then.

Reading about it now makes me wonder where my dad got it since it was supposed to only be available for schools. Maybe he got it from my uncle since he sold A/V equipment to schools.
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Collector KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51



Ah.... the trash 80!! my school had one, lots of fun!!!

I started on the Vic20 with a cassette tape drive!!!! Of course we got the C64 when it came out - still have it with games, printer and all!!
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
I never owned a Radio Shack computer. One of my best friends in high school had an earlier model and I remember him having programs on a cassette tape. I thought that was stupid even then. I did ask my parents for a Sinclair ZX-80 and they bought me one. It was the size of an adding machine. When I discovered that it didn't scroll automatically, I gave up on it. You had to manually refresh the screen before you could see any changes. It only had 4KB of memory. I bought the upgrade to 8KB of memory which made it a ZX-81. I still never used it. It's probably like new in the box. I still have it. Most of my playing around was on the Apple II clone.

That ad was actually the back cover of this magazine. It's the first issue.



I was away from computers from 1981-1998. I learned so much prior to 1981 that I picked up on things very quickly when I had my hands on one again.
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Collector esaravo private msg quote post Address this user
@X51 - I remember using that exact Trash-80 model at work with the dual giant floppy disks. Slower than dirt. I even remember using that thing to calculate stats for a fantasy baseball league (back when it was called Rotisserie Baseball) way back when. Using an early form of Visi-Calc, you would make it not recalculate after every entry, but wait until all the data was input (we used the Tuesday and Wednesday editions of USA Today for stats). When the data was in and you hit recalculate, the machine would go blank for twenty or more minutes trying to figure out the stats. When phone modems came along (remember jamming the phone receiver into those cradles? Hell, do you remember hand-held house phones and land lines?) we thought that was great! Now there are hundreds of free leagues (but that original fantasy league that I was in over 30 years ago is still running). Thanks for the nice little trip down memory lane.
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
I have distinct memories tied to My friend that owned the TRS-80. I helped him build a glider for a science project. He said my encouragement helped inspire him to become a Navy pilot. I remember listening to Journey's new album at his house.



He went on to be a test pilot. I visited him in either 2001 or 2003. He gave me a tour of his base and showed me the prototypes for the X-35 Joint Strike Fighter. He was working in coordination with the software engineers to tweak the fly-by-wire software. The lift engine was removed and I could look inside. I was staring right at a titanium plate that took something like 10 months to mil out with a diamond tip bit. It was pretty cool.
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Collector KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by esaravo
@X51 - I remember using that exact Trash-80 model at work with the dual giant floppy disks. Slower than dirt. I even remember using that thing to calculate stats for a fantasy baseball league (back when it was called Rotisserie Baseball) way back when. Using an early form of Visi-Calc, you would make it not recalculate after every entry, but wait until all the data was input (we used the Tuesday and Wednesday editions of USA Today for stats). When the data was in and you hit recalculate, the machine would go blank for twenty or more minutes trying to figure out the stats. When phone modems came along (remember jamming the phone receiver into those cradles? Hell, do you remember hand-held house phones and land lines?) we thought that was great! Now there are hundreds of free leagues (but that original fantasy league that I was in over 30 years ago is still running). Thanks for the nice little trip down memory lane.


yeah baby - those hand held cradles were awesome!! was only a kid but I remember.
On my Vic20 maybe also with the C64 we subscribed to a magazine "Bits and Bytes" and the last 10 or so pages were all machine language (0's and 1's!!!) I would key those in and after a few issues you had a game!! - assuming of course I hadn't messed up the input somewhere

In high school our computer lab had a Commodore 'PET' with one central mainframe to save the whole classes info on. I knew enough back then to be able to get into other peoples files and just copy their work so I didn't have to do any for my assignments!!!

I'd be lost today though
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Collector Drogio private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatKomics
Quote:
Originally Posted by esaravo
@X51 - I remember using that exact Trash-80 model at work with the dual giant floppy disks. Slower than dirt. I even remember using that thing to calculate stats for a fantasy baseball league (back when it was called Rotisserie Baseball) way back when. Using an early form of Visi-Calc, you would make it not recalculate after every entry, but wait until all the data was input (we used the Tuesday and Wednesday editions of USA Today for stats). When the data was in and you hit recalculate, the machine would go blank for twenty or more minutes trying to figure out the stats. When phone modems came along (remember jamming the phone receiver into those cradles? Hell, do you remember hand-held house phones and land lines?) we thought that was great! Now there are hundreds of free leagues (but that original fantasy league that I was in over 30 years ago is still running). Thanks for the nice little trip down memory lane.


yeah baby - those hand held cradles were awesome!! was only a kid but I remember.
On my Vic20 maybe also with the C64 we subscribed to a magazine "Bits and Bytes" and the last 10 or so pages were all machine language (0's and 1's!!!) I would key those in and after a few issues you had a game!! - assuming of course I hadn't messed up the input somewhere

In high school our computer lab had a Commodore 'PET' with one central mainframe to save the whole classes info on. I knew enough back then to be able to get into other peoples files and just copy their work so I didn't have to do any for my assignments!!!

I'd be lost today though


The C=64 was known as the game machine. Forget about Atari or IBM...

I had at least 1000 games. My dad had a friend who had disc copy software...and he and his buddies would trade pirated games. My favorites were Raid Over Moscow
, jump-man and the Bards Tale... I could play castle wolfenstein for hours as well. Then we had all the arcade hits...pac man, Q-Bert, spy hunter, dig dug, asteroids, space invaders...on and on and on...

Thank goodness I discovered comic books to break me of that awful obsession!!!
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Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
what computer originally had Ye Ar Kung Fu and Impossible Mission?



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Collector 50AE_DE private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drogio
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatKomics
Quote:
Originally Posted by esaravo
@X51 - I remember using that exact Trash-80 model at work with the dual giant floppy disks. Slower than dirt. I even remember using that thing to calculate stats for a fantasy baseball league (back when it was called Rotisserie Baseball) way back when. Using an early form of Visi-Calc, you would make it not recalculate after every entry, but wait until all the data was input (we used the Tuesday and Wednesday editions of USA Today for stats). When the data was in and you hit recalculate, the machine would go blank for twenty or more minutes trying to figure out the stats. When phone modems came along (remember jamming the phone receiver into those cradles? Hell, do you remember hand-held house phones and land lines?) we thought that was great! Now there are hundreds of free leagues (but that original fantasy league that I was in over 30 years ago is still running). Thanks for the nice little trip down memory lane.


yeah baby - those hand held cradles were awesome!! was only a kid but I remember.
On my Vic20 maybe also with the C64 we subscribed to a magazine "Bits and Bytes" and the last 10 or so pages were all machine language (0's and 1's!!!) I would key those in and after a few issues you had a game!! - assuming of course I hadn't messed up the input somewhere

In high school our computer lab had a Commodore 'PET' with one central mainframe to save the whole classes info on. I knew enough back then to be able to get into other peoples files and just copy their work so I didn't have to do any for my assignments!!!

I'd be lost today though


The C=64 was known as the game machine. Forget about Atari or IBM...

I had at least 1000 games. My dad had a friend who had disc copy software...and he and his buddies would trade pirated games. My favorites were Raid Over Moscow
, jump-man and the Bards Tale... I could play castle wolfenstein for hours as well. Then we had all the arcade hits...pac man, Q-Bert, spy hunter, dig dug, asteroids, space invaders...on and on and on...

Thank goodness I discovered comic books to break me of that awful obsession!!!


The C64 was an awesome system. Fast Hack'em was one of the best copying software. My favorite games were Bard's Tale 2 and Ultima 3. I spent tons of hours on those two games. Good times...
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Collector KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
@GAC Oh man!!! Impossible Mission - "Stay Here...Stay Here FOREVER!!!!" loved that game.
I should fire up the C64 (or buy the mini 64 with the pre-loaded games) these are games I could kick my kids butt at!!!
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Collector KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
@50AE_DE fast hack'em...was that the one that let you see the tracks on the disk and how much space they took up so you could just copy the game and not the smaller security file??
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Online C64 emulator..

https://virtualconsoles.com/online-emulators/c64/
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Collector 50AE_DE private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatKomics
@50AE_DE fast hack'em...was that the one that let you see the tracks on the disk and how much space they took up so you could just copy the game and not the smaller security file??


It's been so long but I think it was the one that would patch the game after it was copied. It would have a long list of game patches and you would just select the game and it would create errors on the disc top mimic the errors that the originals produced.
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Collector 50AE_DE private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatKomics
@GAC Oh man!!! Impossible Mission - "Stay Here...Stay Here FOREVER!!!!" loved that game.
I should fire up the C64 (or buy the mini 64 with the pre-loaded games) these are games I could kick my kids butt at!!!


Impossible mission was a tough game. I remember how impressive the characters animation was when he ran across the screen.
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Collector Tedsaid private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
I did ask my parents for a Sinclair ZX-80 and they bought me one. It was the size of an adding machine. When I discovered that it didn't scroll automatically, I gave up on it. You had to manually refresh the screen before you could see any changes. It only had 4KB of memory. I bought the upgrade to 8KB of memory which made it a ZX-81. I still never used it. It's probably like new in the box. I still have it.

You know, you could sell that on eBay for $300 or $400, buy yourself a nice comic book or two.
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Collector Drogio private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by 50AE_DE
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatKomics
@GAC Oh man!!! Impossible Mission - "Stay Here...Stay Here FOREVER!!!!" loved that game.
I should fire up the C64 (or buy the mini 64 with the pre-loaded games) these are games I could kick my kids butt at!!!


Impossible mission was a tough game. I remember how impressive the characters animation was when he ran across the screen.


I had that and mission impossible II. Still have he box and instructions in my basement. I remember getting a catalog and looking through all the games, and picking out ones that had dropped to $5-7 and sending in money orders...and wait what seemed like forever for them to arrive...but it was nothing like sending in comics for grading....
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedsaid
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
I did ask my parents for a Sinclair ZX-80 and they bought me one. It was the size of an adding machine. When I discovered that it didn't scroll automatically, I gave up on it. You had to manually refresh the screen before you could see any changes. It only had 4KB of memory. I bought the upgrade to 8KB of memory which made it a ZX-81. I still never used it. It's probably like new in the box. I still have it.

You know, you could sell that on eBay for $300 or $400, buy yourself a nice comic book or two.


Yeah. I know it has some value, but I've been working so much this year that money isn't a huge motivation. I'm really not buying that much. I have too many comics as it is.
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