Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »
CBCS Comics
Not a CBCS member yet? Join now »

Remembering great comics no longer in our collections...7233

Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
This is a tribute for fallen soldiers, comics that were once vital contributors to our collections, but are now missing in action. These are the brave veteran comics of our hobby who've moved on to other collections. At one time each stood proudly in parade formation with others we loved and respected, but alas, they've departed to serve other masters.

So, where are these golden aged legionaires now? Slabbed and buried in some vault, cracked out and freed from their encapsulations to wander raw and aimlessly or promoted in rank in a new holder, relabeled to even greater admiration? These are the untold stories!

Here's the first of mine...




Daredevil Battles Hitler, the slam-bang book-length epic that constitutes Daredevil Comics first issue. Charles Biro and Bob Wood produced a phenomenal cover, ...in fact, one so iconic it literally made the series which followed an instant hit.

I've owned two copie of this treasured book, the first was 8.5, sold when I upgraded to a second 9.2 copy. Both suffered from sun shadows and mediocre PQ (cream to off-white), ...but still, it's DBH and even though I justified parting company with both, I know another copy of this book and I will cross paths and join forces again. C'est le guerre.

More thrilling tales of yesteryear later. I'm sure you have stories to tell as well! If you like the stories and books posted, take a second to click the little approval button on the upper right of each thread contribution. Let us know what you think!
Post 1 IP   flag post
Collector Rafel private msg quote post Address this user
Love that cover!! WIsh I had that one. I do have YOUNG ALLIES #1.
Post 2 IP   flag post
Collector Gaard private msg quote post Address this user
Sister bought it for me for my 13th b-day (1975). Sold it when I started liking the ladies.


Post 3 IP   flag post
Collector kevinlmillard private msg quote post Address this user

I traded a kid that didn't like comic book a Ken Griffey Jr rookie card for this book back in 1990. Then karma took it from me 5 years later when my mom and I were moving, and her friend helped us move. I told my mom it was missing the next day and she said it was just a comic book!!
Post 4 IP   flag post
Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
no regrets about this but I gave my brother these 3 comics to kickstart his collection. I've since replaced them in my own collection.








Post 5 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinlmillard

I traded a kid that didn't like comic book a Ken Griffey Jr rookie card for this book back in 1990. Then karma took it from me 5 years later when my mom and I were moving, and her friend helped us move. I told my mom it was missing the next day and she said it was just a comic book!!


I made a trade for one and was in awe that I owned it. My copy was in lower grade shape than I like to collect, so I traded it and some other comics for a slightly better FF#1. I would not have made the trade, except I acquired an Amazing Fantasy #15 that meant so much more. The first Fantastic Four appearance meant more to me than the second Spider-man appearance.
Post 6 IP   flag post
Collector SpiderTim private msg quote post Address this user

Post 7 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user

Post 8 IP   flag post
Collector 00slim private msg quote post Address this user
I sold a lot of my nicer books to buy my wife’s wedding ring. I have since replaced them all & in nicer grades. She’s been incredibly supportive of my hobby. It’ll be our 6 year anniversary next month (9/23).

But there are a couple I’d purchased since then that I wished I’d hung onto a bit longer!

I purchased a set of Venom: Lethal Protector books, red foil 9.8 & gold 9.4 for about $120 a few years back. I probably doubled my money when I flipped them, but I’ll bet I could have done a lot better in the current market.
Post 9 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Here is my dearly departed copy of Human Torch #5 (7.5). After upgrading to a nicer 8.5 copy I decided it was time to share my joy of owning this classic issue with other fans...



.
Post 10 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR Foghorn_Sam private msg quote post Address this user
This is the Giant-Size X-Men #1 that I bought off the rack myself in 1975. It is also one of the first books I ever had graded. This is also before I knew anything about pressing so it wasn't pressed. I sold in 2009 for $1150. These are easily going for more than twice that now in that grade. It's registration number can no longer be verified, so I imagine it has surely gone through a CPR process by now. I'd like to know what ever happened to it and what grade it eventually got. If by chance any of you here recognize it by its cut and wrap and think you might own it, let me know.


Post 11 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user




I sold this one to @DarthLego. I wish I had it back.
Post 12 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user



I sold this one to @meg. I wish I had it back.
Post 13 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
I don't have scans of the things that are no longer in my collection.
I still have the majority of everything I've ever bought.
In most cases, I traded only duplicates, so I don't think of it as a loss.

Noteworthy losses that went to a good cause..

Two (2) lower grade Copies of Strange Tales #110. I sold one and I put one (1) into a trade for an Amazing-Spider-Man #1. I have 3 copies, so I'm fine with that.

Amazing-Spider-Man #1. I traded it and some other books for an FF#1 in slightly better shape. I wish I still owned the book, but I still like having FF#1 more.

Senseless money grab...

Strange Worlds #2. Sold it because it was an oddball item and I didn't think I'd pursue collecting the series. I wish I'd kept it.

Amazing Adult Fantasy #7. Sold it because of the profit margin. I'd bought it at a musty used record store for $3. It was in a small out of place box on the floor. The owner evidently knew nothing about comics. I think I sold it for $90. At the time it was greed and I needed the cash more than I would now. I wish I'd kept it.
Post 14 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
I traded this as part of a deal to obtain a different book in higher grade around six years ago (the BT was graded 6.5, but presents better). It's such a cool Schomburg visual that I still miss it...




Note: in spite of the subject and war bonds banner, this was a post-war book (Dec.'45). Love the anticipation of big screen TV technology.
Post 15 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Television was around and news features were played before movies in the theater, so there isn't a lot of imagination necessary to anticipate a giant TV. I'm more impressed with the video chat shown in the movie Metrpololis. I think that was about 1920.
Post 16 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
@X51 1927 (no snarkiness intended, ...it's just that silent films are another area where I tend to be a bit obsessive)
Post 17 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
This Red Seal wasn't a highly valued comic, but Paul Gatuso cover art gives it some pizazz and the character Black Dwarf who dressed in green, not black, was short, but no dwarf, wore a long monk's robe with a short crested wide-brim hat and red cape is one of the more interesting heroes to come from Chesler...




Yeah, the RD is a ridiculous character, but I think that's what makes Red Seal kinda cool.
Post 18 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
One more dearly departed book before Catman hits the sack, this one a nice looking copy of Captain America #58 (CGC 6.5 loose centerfold). One of the first Caps I ever purchased, but only kept it a couple of years. Haven't replaced it yet, although I'm always on the lookout for another copy in high grade...



.
Post 19 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
@X51 1927 (no snarkiness intended, ...it's just that silent films are another area where I tend to be a bit obsessive)


My goal is to quit remembering things like this and quit living in the past. I could have looked at the DVD which I own or done a quick Google search. Thanks for clarification.
Post 20 IP   flag post
Collector Frontier2Xterra private msg quote post Address this user
No pictures but I had a GSX 1 7.5 that I let go back in 05 for stupid cheap because I was young, mom just passed and needed dough.

Don’t really regret as it was needed at the time but just wish I would have been able to hold on to. The prices they go for now are insane and I just can’t justify the tag to put back in collection.
Post 21 IP   flag post
Collector Helric1 private msg quote post Address this user
I kind of wish I would have kept this one

Post 22 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
@X51 1927 (no snarkiness intended, ...it's just that silent films are another area where I tend to be a bit obsessive)


My goal is to quit remembering things like this and quit living in the past. I could have looked at the DVD which I own or done a quick Google search. Thanks for clarification.


Wow. That must create a conflicted situation for a comic collector since collecting at it's heart is based on nostalgia.

Alas, I'm drawn to history like a moth to light. From my perspective historical accuracy is critical to making any case about progress, which I thought was your original point.

My only point about the Black Terror cover was in respect to the coolness of Schomburg's big screen TV visual in post-war 1945. TVs that were available to the public after WWII were far less advanced than that futuristic concept.

Peace, bro.
.
Post 23 IP   flag post
Collector michaelekrupp private msg quote post Address this user
While I have seen many comics come and go over the years, among my greatest laments is that I was once very close to completing my set of Amazing Spider-Man. At least complete up to the point where I quit buying new comics in early 1992. I didn’t have the first three, but I had the majority from issue 4 up. Unfortunately somewhere in the early 2000s, my wife had gotten into some credit card trouble. I sold most of my early issues for a few thousand dollars, most likely never to be replaced. The saddest part of the story is, instead of reinventing the money into some cool golden age or something awesome, all of the money went to American Express.☹️
Post 24 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelekrupp
While I have seen many comics come and go over the years, among my greatest laments is that I was once very close to completing my set of Amazing Spider-Man. At least complete up to the point where I quit buying new comics in early 1992. I didn’t have the first three, but I had the majority from issue 4 up. Unfortunately somewhere in the early 2000s, my wife had gotten into some credit card trouble. I sold most of my early issues for a few thousand dollars, most likely never to be replaced. The saddest part of the story is, instead of reinventing the money into some cool golden age or something awesome, all of the money went to American Express.☹️


I hear ya. My situation in the early 90's wasn't that much different. Thankfully I wasn't heavily in debt nor married at the time, but moving from Oklahoma to Texas and reestabishing my career goals involved expenses I didn't want to pass along to relatives living in the area.

So, I sold off my GA comics, including a number of Edgar Church pedigree books, that in all likelihood I'll never see again ...even though I'd buy them in a heartbeat today at a much inflated price.

As for credit card debt, yeah, it can be a serious pain in the butt (anatomically centered in the wallet region). Fortunately, that isn't the case today (fingers crossed), but finding that path to a relatively debt free status took time, discipline and a lot of patience.


.
Post 25 IP   flag post
Collector michaelekrupp private msg quote post Address this user
Financial responsibility is an important if sometimes painful life lesson to learn. But it’s hard to beat the simple pleasure of a zero balance 🙂.
Post 26 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
@X51 1927 (no snarkiness intended, ...it's just that silent films are another area where I tend to be a bit obsessive)


My goal is to quit remembering things like this and quit living in the past. I could have looked at the DVD which I own or done a quick Google search. Thanks for clarification.


Wow. That must create a conflicted situation for a comic collector since collecting at it's heart is based on nostalgia.

Alas, I'm drawn to history like a moth to light. From my perspective historical accuracy is critical to making any case about progress, which I thought was your original point.

My only point about the Black Terror cover was in respect to the coolness of Schomburg's big screen TV visual in post-war 1945. TVs that were available to the public after WWII were far less advanced than that futuristic concept.

Peace, bro.
.


Not really conflicted because I've drastically cut my buying and I realize that I have long boxes of comics that I haven't had any desire to open in 20 years. I think they're neat, but I saw my dad hoard stuff for decades until he was close to passing away. At that point he had a dumpster delivered to the house and things he'd saved for decades went into the dumpster and were tossed. I reevaluated my own perspective on collecting (hoarding?) at that point. When I was younger, I was more interested in absorbing life around me and getting a feel for what makes the world tick. In my current occupation, our company changes the world and it defines what the world around me will be. There's less of a desire to soak things in and more of a desire to use what I know to affect change.

Comic books from 1960 used to seem ancient to me, yet comics from the 70's feel like yesterday to me now. My grandmother used to reminisce to me about an event that happened in 1906. My whole perspective on time, events, and life is different now than when I started collecting.
Post 27 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelekrupp
While I have seen many comics come and go over the years, among my greatest laments is that I was once very close to completing my set of Amazing Spider-Man. At least complete up to the point where I quit buying new comics in early 1992. I didn’t have the first three, but I had the majority from issue 4 up. Unfortunately somewhere in the early 2000s, my wife had gotten into some credit card trouble. I sold most of my early issues for a few thousand dollars, most likely never to be replaced. The saddest part of the story is, instead of reinventing the money into some cool golden age or something awesome, all of the money went to American Express.☹️


I hear ya. My situation in the early 90's wasn't that much different. Thankfully I wasn't heavily in debt nor married at the time, but moving from Oklahoma to Texas and reestabishing my career goals involved expenses I didn't want to pass along to relatives living in the area.

So, I sold off my GA comics, including a number of Edgar Church pedigree books, that in all likelihood I'll never see again ...even though I'd buy them in a heartbeat today at a much inflated price.

As for credit card debt, yeah, it can be a serious pain in the butt (anatomically centered in the wallet region). Fortunately, that isn't the case today (fingers crossed), but finding that path to a relatively debt free status took time, discipline and a lot of patience.


.


There's nothing more liberating than knowing you aren't getting a bill from someone every month.
Post 28 IP   flag post
Collector 00slim private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaptainmyke




I sold this one to @DarthLego. I wish I had it back.


That sketch is amazing. I’ve always loved Krang. 👍🏼
Post 29 IP   flag post
Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
@X51 1927 (no snarkiness intended, ...it's just that silent films are another area where I tend to be a bit obsessive)


My goal is to quit remembering things like this and quit living in the past. I could have looked at the DVD which I own or done a quick Google search. Thanks for clarification.


Wow. That must create a conflicted situation for a comic collector since collecting at it's heart is based on nostalgia.

Alas, I'm drawn to history like a moth to light. From my perspective historical accuracy is critical to making any case about progress, which I thought was your original point.

My only point about the Black Terror cover was in respect to the coolness of Schomburg's big screen TV visual in post-war 1945. TVs that were available to the public after WWII were far less advanced than that futuristic concept.

Peace, bro.
.


Not really conflicted because I've drastically cut my buying and I realize that I have long boxes of comics that I haven't had any desire to open in 20 years. I think they're neat, but I saw my dad hoard stuff for decades until he was close to passing away. At that point he had a dumpster delivered to the house and things he'd saved for decades went into the dumpster and were tossed. I reevaluated my own perspective on collecting (hoarding?) at that point. When I was younger, I was more interested in absorbing life around me and getting a feel for what makes the world tick. In my current occupation, our company changes the world and it defines what the world around me will be. There's less of a desire to soak things in and more of a desire to use what I know to affect change.

Comic books from 1960 used to seem ancient to me, yet comics from the 70's feel like yesterday to me now. My grandmother used to reminisce to me about an event that happened in 1906. My whole perspective on time, events, and life is different now than when I started collecting.


There's a vast distance between measured collecting and uncontrolled hoarding, but I'm keenly aware that some folks are prone to compulsive acquisition to the point where gross excess becomes routine. The human male is a hunter/gatherer by nature, so in some ways, it's in our DNA. The control of that inclination is the point where responsible collecting takes precedence.

As a reasonably progressive, well informed individual, I'm curious about any company "...which changes the world and defines what the world around us will be." Not disputing your point, however I'm persuaded by a lifetime of experience that businesses which have an impact on the world around us should also have peer review and oversight.

It's impressive how your grandmother's reminiscences impacted your perspective on time, events and life. Apparently, she was recalling something historic that mattered to her. IMO, it's through shared experiences that we build a better world. In a more modest way, comics are a time capsule, reflecting the culture, history and values that existed at the time they were published.

One of my favorite philosophical quotes is from Georges Santayana. To paraphrase, "those who do not learn from history are destined to repeat it."
.

Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelekrupp
While I have seen many comics come and go over the years, among my greatest laments is that I was once very close to completing my set of Amazing Spider-Man. At least complete up to the point where I quit buying new comics in early 1992. I didn’t have the first three, but I had the majority from issue 4 up. Unfortunately somewhere in the early 2000s, my wife had gotten into some credit card trouble. I sold most of my early issues for a few thousand dollars, most likely never to be replaced. The saddest part of the story is, instead of reinventing the money into some cool golden age or something awesome, all of the money went to American Express.☹️


I hear ya. My situation in the early 90's wasn't that much different. Thankfully I wasn't heavily in debt nor married at the time, but moving from Oklahoma to Texas and reestabishing my career goals involved expenses I didn't want to pass along to relatives living in the area.

So, I sold off my GA comics, including a number of Edgar Church pedigree books, that in all likelihood I'll never see again ...even though I'd buy them in a heartbeat today at a much inflated price.

As for credit card debt, yeah, it can be a serious pain in the butt (anatomically centered in the wallet region). Fortunately, that isn't the case today (fingers crossed), but finding that path to a relatively debt free status took time, discipline and a lot of patience.


.


There's nothing more liberating than knowing you aren't getting a bill from someone every month.


This is true. At the same time having a modest amount of credit debt is a good thing if one wishes to keep a good credit rating. It's that careful balance between advisable credit and having too much debt that keeps personal and business finances healthy.
.
Post 30 IP   flag post
209671 82 30
Log in or sign up to compose a reply.
destitute