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What did the letterer do???7057

Collector Aliens private msg quote post Address this user
So if you look at silver age comic credits example, written by stan lee, drawn by Steve ditko, lettered by Artie Simek... in interviews by stan, stan has always said the artists finished the art and he filled in the dialogue, but if he filled out the dialogue than what did the letterer do exactley? Also I know some people will think that I am against stan or something like that... I am not! I love stan I just don't get what the letterer did. I mean I understand that maybe a letterer was there to re write the dialogue in a legible manner but I'm not sure? Anyone know? Thanks
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Collector GAC private msg quote post Address this user
Krack...Boom....Pow!!!!!
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Collector DrWatson private msg quote post Address this user
"A letterer is a member of a team of comic book creators responsible for drawing the comic book's text. The letterer's use of typefaces, calligraphy, letter size, and layout all contribute to the impact of the comic. The letterer crafts the comic's 'display lettering': the story title lettering and other special captions and credits that usually appear on a story's first page. The letterer also writes the letters in the word balloons and draws in sound effects. Many letterers also design logos for the comic book company's various titles."
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Collector Aliens private msg quote post Address this user
Wait so did stan not write the words in the bubbles?
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Collector KYoung_1974 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aliens
Wait so did stan not write the words in the bubbles?

More than likely he wrote it out on a sheet of paper
Page 1: panel 1 : Mr Fantastic - "Stop Doom!"
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COLLECTOR shrewbeer private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aliens
Wait so did stan not write the words in the bubbles?


Correct.

Them fancy computer machines took the letterers job.
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Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aliens
Wait so did stan not write the words in the bubbles?


Stan Lee may live in a bubble, but he doesn't write in them.
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Collector Masochism private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatmanAmerica

Stan Lee may live in a bubble, but he doesn't write in them.


Ba-dum-tiss!
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
There are different types of scripts. They can be full detail with every panel described precisely and every line of dialogue filled in exactly. They can be loose plots described with hand written notes. The letterer is the one who transcribes the words onto the art itself. Sometimes the original art will have notes in the border that the artist and the writer wrote for one another, but the writer doesn't put the inked letters onto the page.
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Collector MR_SigS private msg quote post Address this user
Here you can see the original words underneath Mike Royer's inked letters.






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Collector MR_SigS private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrWatson
"... Many letterers also design logos for the comic book company's various titles."


Artistic in itself, as you can see in the above examples. Coming up with something fresh was no easy task for Mike during his Kirby years as he was already inking AND lettering 3 pages per day.

That kind of production output will always blow my mind.
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Collector Aliens private msg quote post Address this user
I thought that too. Then did the writer write down the dialogue in the bubbles and the letter just wrote over it and made it legible and nice looking?
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Not usually. Usually the artist is tasked with giving the letterer room to add the word balloons and the letterer is tasked with making it fit.

Computers should give the letterer more flexibility. Things can be digitally tweaked in the later stages if necessary.
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Collector CatmanAmerica private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
Not usually. Usually the artist is tasked with giving the letterer room to add the word balloons and the letterer is tasked with making it fit.

Computers should give the letterer more flexibility. Things can be digitally tweaked in the later stages if necessary.


During the GA ('36 through '55) when there were dozens of comic publishers vying for art, most work was done in art-shops and farmed out to publishers to meet their requirements, usually to justify page count and filler. Often artists did their own lettering or took turns doing it, and those with very stylized work ...accompanied by stylized word balloons... often did their own lettering. Basil Wolverton immediately comes to mind.

Over time there were folks who specialized in lettering. That developed as part of an assembly line process which has been further refined to include digital tweaking or computerized lettering. Today, it's all done by formula, for better or worse.

Give me Gold, I don'need no stinkin' digital tweaking!
.
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Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Gold is to you what silver and bronze are to me. I like having digital lettering available, but one of the most respected companies dedicated to fonts today produces some of the most God awful lettering in comics today. I inadvertently inherited almost their whole catalog of fonts and I like maybe 5 of them.
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