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Question on Pence (UK) comic TOS 396321

COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user
colour = color
flavour = flavor
humour = humor
labour = labor
neighbour = neighbor
car hood = bonnet
apartment = flat
cigarette = fag
apologize or apologise = Apologize
organize or organise = Organize
recognize or recognise = Recognize
defence = defense
licence = license
offence = offense
pretence = pretense

British English sometimes keeps silent "e" when adding suffixes where American English does not. Generally speaking, British English drops it in only some cases in which it is needed to show pronunciation whereas American English only uses it where needed.



And they drive on the right side of the road.
Post 26 IP   flag post
Collector esaravo private msg quote post Address this user
The “non-colour” Pence comics that I own include magazine-sized issues with reprints, such as:





Post 27 IP   flag post
Collector esaravo private msg quote post Address this user
And pocket-sized digest comics also with reprints, such as:





Post 28 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR conditionfreak private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaptainmyke
colour = color
flavour = flavor
humour = humor
labour = labor
neighbour = neighbor
car hood = bonnet
apartment = flat
cigarette = fag
apologize or apologise = Apologize
organize or organise = Organize
recognize or recognise = Recognize
defence = defense
licence = license
offence = offense
pretence = pretense

British English sometimes keeps silent "e" when adding suffixes where American English does not. Generally speaking, British English drops it in only some cases in which it is needed to show pronunciation whereas American English only uses it where needed.



And they drive on the right side of the road.
Wrong side.
Post 29 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaptainmyke
colour = color
flavour = flavor
humour = humor
labour = labor
neighbour = neighbor
car hood = bonnet
apartment = flat
cigarette = fag
apologize or apologise = Apologize
organize or organise = Organize
recognize or recognise = Recognize
defence = defense
licence = license
offence = offense
pretence = pretense

British English sometimes keeps silent "e" when adding suffixes where American English does not. Generally speaking, British English drops it in only some cases in which it is needed to show pronunciation whereas American English only uses it where needed.



And they drive on the right side of the road.


Daniel Webster changed all of that when he wrote our dictionary. He wanted to Americanize our language.
Post 30 IP   flag post


Collector KatKomics private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaptainmyke
colour = color
flavour = flavor
humour = humor
labour = labor
neighbour = neighbor
car hood = bonnet
apartment = flat
cigarette = fag
apologize or apologise = Apologize
organize or organise = Organize
recognize or recognise = Recognize
defence = defense
licence = license
offence = offense
pretence = pretense

British English sometimes keeps silent "e" when adding suffixes where American English does not. Generally speaking, British English drops it in only some cases in which it is needed to show pronunciation whereas American English only uses it where needed.



And they drive on the right side of the road.


Daniel Webster changed all of that when he wrote our dictionary. He wanted to Americanize our language.


we also have two checks - the one if you are under 20 you have never written = cheque. The one you put in a box = check , as in check mark
Post 31 IP   flag post
Collector Tedsaid private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatKomics
Quote:
Originally Posted by X51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaptainmyke
colour = color
flavour = flavor
humour = humor
labour = labor
neighbour = neighbor
car hood = bonnet
apartment = flat
cigarette = fag
apologize or apologise = Apologize
organize or organise = Organize
recognize or recognise = Recognize
defence = defense
licence = license
offence = offense
pretence = pretense

Daniel Webster changed all of that when he wrote our dictionary. He wanted to Americanize our language.

we also have two checks - the one if you are under 20 you have never written = cheque. The one you put in a box = check , as in check mark

And instead of "Watch your step" it is "mind the step."
Instead of the Subway, you ride the Underground.
You don't line up for tickets, but you can queue up for them. In a queue.
Apartments aren't For Rent, but rather To Let (as in "sublet" ).
And you won't believe how they pronounce vitamins, dictionary, aluminum, and adrenaline. Very strange. (Hint: in the UK, "dictionary" pretty much only has one syllable.)

Perhaps the weirdest, though, is: you don't smoke fags, you blow 'em.
Post 32 IP   flag post
Collector Pvadacchino private msg quote post Address this user
Have this one been looking for awhile but can never find much information. Apparently it was release at the same time as the US copy. The label from CGC doesn't even have down as a pence variant

Post 33 IP   flag post
Collector Odins_Raven private msg quote post Address this user
@Bronte
My friends and I who consider foreign editions of US comics very fun to collect, have done a lot of research on this subject. Most people don't realize that the Silver and Bronze age Marvel "UK edition" (9d/12p) comics were actually printed in the US at the same location and time by the same company and on the same paper as the regular US run of that specific issue, and only differ from these with regard to certain aspects of the cover, while the interior pages are absolutely identical.

Basically its the long-held, common misconceptions and subsequent softer market of desirability that causes these books to typically fetch less than US editions, despite being far more rare.

Here is a link to a good article on the subject.
clickable text
Post 34 IP   flag post
Collector Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
Thank you and tedsaid for sharing that link and the others who also shared their knowledge as well. I had no idea how interesting the history of these books are.
Initially, after getting my book graded I was so angry thinking it was worthless. The comic history lesson would make up for it if the book was worthless.

Fortunately, I received history / English lessons AND my book is worth something.
😀
Post 35 IP   flag post
Collector Pvadacchino private msg quote post Address this user
So, wouldn't the fact that these pence variants are basically identical except for the price stamp make them equal in value as the US cover. Maybe even more due to the fact that there are so little of them in circulation.
Reminds me a little of the US and CAD price variants.
Post 36 IP   flag post
Collector Bronte private msg quote post Address this user
@Pvadacchino
I've never seen CGC ever put Pence variant on their labels. However, I have seen UK edition on mine and a few other books.

I have a batman book that has no mention It was first appearance of ventriloquist. On ebay I have noticed the correct notations on other's books.

Maybe the grader / note taker of the label needed some coffee??
Post 37 IP   flag post
Collector 50AE_DE private msg quote post Address this user
@Pvadacchino the demand is greater for the US edition than the UK edition. I would love for the UK edition to be worth as much as the US edition, but it'll never happen.
Post 38 IP   flag post
CBCS TimBildhauser private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by 50AE_DE
@Pvadacchino the demand is greater for the US edition than the UK edition. I would love for the UK edition to be worth as much as the US edition, but it'll never happen.
I have to disagree with you on this. I'm already seeing people paying equal and in some cases higher prices for Pence copies, particularly on Silver Age Marvel keys. I watch sales on these books closely along with pretty much anything else from outside of the States.
Post 39 IP   flag post
Collector X51 private msg quote post Address this user
The only thing holding them back from selling for more is that many are in low grade. On high grade copies, they will definitely start selling for more. It's a niche collecting market and there will be a group of key collectors that drive up the prices.
Post 40 IP   flag post
Collector 50AE_DE private msg quote post Address this user
@TimBildhauser Are you talking about non-key books or keys? If its keys, then which uk silver age keys are selling for equal or higher than the us version? I can see non-keys going for the same price as a US copy, but not keys.
Post 41 IP   flag post
Collector Redshade private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaptainmyke
colour = color
flavour = flavor
humour = humor
labour = labor
neighbour = neighbor
car hood = bonnet
apartment = flat
cigarette = fag
apologize or apologise = Apologize
organize or organise = Organize
recognize or recognise = Recognize
defence = defense
licence = license
offence = offense
pretence = pretense


British English sometimes keeps silent "e" when adding suffixes where American English does not. Generally speaking, British English drops it in only some cases in which it is needed to show pronunciation whereas American English only uses it where needed.



And they drive on the right side of the road.
Post 42 IP   flag post
Collector Redshade private msg quote post Address this user
Greetings Kap.

Actually, we drive on the left (most people being right handed it was easier that way for coachmen to pass things to each other or for mounted swordsmen to have at each other).

I have not heard of a cigarette being referred to as a fag since the 70s and even then it was common street slang that only a few people of a certain type would use. You would be ridiculed for using the term out of place/context today.

And if I recall the advice that I was given at school. I was advised that the c spelling was used when a noun and the s spelling when a verb. This distinction seems to have been lost for whatever reason in American English.
Post 43 IP   flag post
COLLECTOR conditionfreak private msg quote post Address this user
The one I love is the "boot", when referring to the trunk of a car.

And calling "bagsy" means you are calling "shotgun" on a car ride.

And the curious "Bob's your uncle". Which means something is easier than you initially thought it would be. "Press down on the clutch. Shift the gear lever. Ease up on the clutch, and Bob's your uncle, you're driving".
Post 44 IP   flag post
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