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Collector J_Walker private msg quote post Address this user
How high can I safely stack comics (due to space limitations) without damaging comics from too much weight? I’m alternating spines and things are in nice even stacks now. I understand the elements can get to the comics more easily but I’m just worried about weight for now.


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Collector KingNampa private msg quote post Address this user
Long term, bad idea. Plus what if there is a vibration or earthquake, then your stack will fall down.
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Collector Hexigore private msg quote post Address this user
Ummmmm....if there is an earthquake, I like to believe the Comics will be the least of the concerns. 😜😜😜
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COLLECTOR drchaos private msg quote post Address this user
Shelves are your friends. You can get cheap but sturdy metal shelves from Target, Home Depot, Lowes, etc.

You can never have too many shelves.
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Collector comicsforme private msg quote post Address this user
$10 at auction
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Collector comicsforme private msg quote post Address this user

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COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user
I use those metal bakers racks too ^
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COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingNampa
Long term, bad idea. Plus what if there is a vibration or earthquake, then your stack will fall down.



This had me cracking up. Hahaha

high 5
Chest bump
Butt smack
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Collector J_Walker private msg quote post Address this user
Hmmm...closet has 10 short boxes and only free space is this shelf....guess eventually I’ll need to pour some money into a better solution due to every other room in my house having crazy swings in humidity and temp during the hotter months. Need to take care of that first.
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Collector TommyJasmin private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Walker
How high can I safely stack comics (due to space limitations) without damaging comics from too much weight? I’m alternating spines and things are in nice even stacks now. I understand the elements can get to the comics more easily but I’m just worried about weight for now.


@J_Walker Hi J_Walker... actually, stacking is just fine, and as long as climatic conditions are decent (temp and humidity), weight from stacking is a good thing. Pressure from the weight aids preservation. A great example of this is the Mile High collection. The best books were in a basement closet, stacked floor to ceiling. After all those years, those books were near perfect due to being essentially entombed.

I realize trying to replicate Edgar Church's storage method is not recommended today, but, if I fill say a short box, I tip that box on end and carefully squeeze as many books in as I can, with buffered boards on each inner end, to maximize pressure on them. Of course if you are pulling books in and out of boxes often for various reasons, this is a bit of a pain too, but I assume we are talking essentially long-term storage.
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Walker
How high can I safely stack comics (due to space limitations) without damaging comics from too much weight? I’m alternating spines and things are in nice even stacks now. I understand the elements can get to the comics more easily but I’m just worried about weight for now.


@J_Walker Hi J_Walker... actually, stacking is just fine, and as long as climatic conditions are decent (temp and humidity), weight from stacking is a good thing. Pressure from the weight aids preservation. A great example of this is the Mile High collection. The best books were in a basement closet, stacked floor to ceiling. After all those years, those books were near perfect due to being essentially entombed.

I realize trying to replicate Edgar Church's storage method is not recommended today, but, if I fill say a short box, I tip that box on end and carefully squeeze as many books in as I can, with buffered boards on each inner end, to maximize pressure on them. Of course if you are pulling books in and out of boxes often for various reasons, this is a bit of a pain too, but I assume we are talking essentially long-term storage.



Small stacks are probably ok for awhile. Large stacks create problems such as spine roll and too much weighted pressure blows out staples and Spines.

I would most certainly disregard the Folklore Hogwash of stacking floor to ceiling.

I highly Suggest these Drawer Boxes.

http://www.collectiondrawer.com/comics
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Collector BrianGreensnips private msg quote post Address this user


Here are a couple shelving options from Home Depot.I plan to buy some of the $89 shelves when I redo my comic book area this winter. They seem really sturdy and I can adjust the height of the shelves too to fit my boxes.
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COLLECTOR kaptainmyke private msg quote post Address this user
thats what i do
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Collector cseale0223 private msg quote post Address this user
I would not stack them. Shit can go wrong with that. I use to use a metal rack with boxes but have upgraded to drawer system I built from plans on YouTube.
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Collector TommyJasmin private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944


I would most certainly disregard the Folklore Hogwash of stacking floor to ceiling.



Dude, ask any Mile High owners if that story is Folklore Hogwash.
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Collector TommyJasmin private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944

Small stacks are probably ok for awhile. Large stacks create problems such as spine roll and too much weighted pressure blows out staples and Spines.

I would most certainly disregard the Folklore Hogwash of stacking floor to ceiling.



Curious too, how a flat book under a heavy, unmoving stack would develop spine roll?
That makes no sense. Spine roll develops from a reading style that was of course
much much more common during Silver Age and further back, where you wrap the pages around to
the back while reading. If anything, stacking will mitigate spine roll.
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944


I would most certainly disregard the Folklore Hogwash of stacking floor to ceiling.



Dude, ask any Mile High owners if that story is Folklore Hogwash.



Mile High Sucks

Some of the most overgraded over hyped books Ive ever gotten came from them.
I'll never use their service again.
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944

Small stacks are probably ok for awhile. Large stacks create problems such as spine roll and too much weighted pressure blows out staples and Spines.

I would most certainly disregard the Folklore Hogwash of stacking floor to ceiling.



Curious too, how a flat book under a heavy, unmoving stack would develop spine roll?
That makes no sense. Spine roll develops from a reading style that was of course
much much more common during Silver Age and further back, where you wrap the pages around to
the back while reading. If anything, stacking will mitigate spine roll.


Im not going to get into the dynamics of the problems stacking causes, I think they are widely known among the hobby. Regardless of the "Mile High" story. It's just a bad idea and one I certainly would not recommend.
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Collector BigRedOne1944 private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by cseale0223
I would not stack them. Shit can go wrong with that. I use to use a metal rack with boxes but have upgraded to drawer system I built from plans on YouTube.


This is what I highly Recommend. No need for any kind of racks or shelving.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_Xbk4HoFZ8
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Collector TommyJasmin private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944


I would most certainly disregard the Folklore Hogwash of stacking floor to ceiling.



Dude, ask any Mile High owners if that story is Folklore Hogwash.



Mile High Sucks

Some of the most overgraded over hyped books Ive ever gotten came from them.
I'll never use their service again.


I'm not a big fan of Mile High Comics either. I was referring to actual comics from the original Mile High (Edgar Church) collection. That story is not folklore hogwash - it happened. They were stacked 7 feet high in a basement closet and the ones near the bottom - under the most weight and pressure, were the most pristine, like they were printed that day.
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Collector TommyJasmin private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJasmin
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedOne1944

Small stacks are probably ok for awhile. Large stacks create problems such as spine roll and too much weighted pressure blows out staples and Spines.

I would most certainly disregard the Folklore Hogwash of stacking floor to ceiling.



Curious too, how a flat book under a heavy, unmoving stack would develop spine roll?
That makes no sense. Spine roll develops from a reading style that was of course
much much more common during Silver Age and further back, where you wrap the pages around to
the back while reading. If anything, stacking will mitigate spine roll.


Im not going to get into the dynamics of the problems stacking causes, I think they are widely known among the hobby. Regardless of the "Mile High" story. It's just a bad idea and one I certainly would not recommend.


Ok first of all, nobody is recommending J_Walker store his books unbagged, unboarded, in 7 foot stacks in his basement. I simply answered his question about whether weight from closet stacking will damage his books, and I maintain it will not. I have a very elaborate storage system I use, which I could detail if needed, but it does not involve stacking. Second, as far as "dynamics of stacking problems" widely known in the hobby, I've been around awhile, and I have never heard of a single case of the three problems you stated (1. books developing spine roll, 2. staples popping, 3. spines splitting).
Post 21 • IP   flag post
Collector comicsforme private msg quote post Address this user
The comics we buy today are different.Different paper.I have comics 20 yrs old that give better grade than the ones we buy today so stacking with comics today i think is not a good choice.Thats just my input do what you think is best.Good look
Post 22 • IP   flag post
Collector J_Walker private msg quote post Address this user
Thanks all. Good info all around.

For the record, these would be stacks of ~30 books with each book in a mylite2 & fullback combo and alternating the spines.
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COLLECTOR JLS_Comics private msg quote post Address this user
If they need to be on that shelf, can't you just stand them up and lean them against the wall?
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COLLECTOR shrewbeer private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Walker
Thanks all. Good info all around.

For the record, these would be stacks of ~30 books with each book in a mylite2 & fullback combo and alternating the spines.


Aside from possibly falling off the shelves, I dont see anything wrong with stacks of 30. If anything, the books are better off with some pressure as @TommyJasmin pointed out.

All my books are in horizontal shortboxes, except the incomplete boxes. Those are flipped on end, and the books are stacked vertical until the box fills up!
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COLLECTOR JLS_Comics private msg quote post Address this user
I have some incomplete short boxes too. In those I rotate about 15-20 books sideways so it creates somewhat of a bookend until the box fills up more. (I'm not implying anyone is wrong; just sharing another tactic to employ)
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Collector thelastbard private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by shrewbeer
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Walker
Thanks all. Good info all around.

For the record, these would be stacks of ~30 books with each book in a mylite2 & fullback combo and alternating the spines.


Aside from possibly falling off the shelves, I dont see anything wrong with stacks of 30. If anything, the books are better off with some pressure as @TommyJasmin pointed out.

All my books are in horizontal shortboxes, except the incomplete boxes. Those are flipped on end, and the books are stacked vertical until the box fills up!


If I have incomplete boxes, I just put something else in there to fill it up until more books are in there (trades or whatever)...

Stacking... I do stack some as an interim before going into boxes (sorting, just pulled out, waiting for more boxes to deliver, whatever), but for 30+ years of collecting, I haven't done it for longer than necessary.

As mentioned, large stacks or "squish" tactics, can help preserve, but my concern with doing that in boxes are those pesky hand holds. Even when I pack loosely (I rarely pack them "right", I'm just in the habit of lifting them from underneath. There's a reason I don't let people move them for me when I re-locate.
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COLLECTOR shrewbeer private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelastbard
"squish" tactics


It should be noted that heavy cardstock covers from the last decade do not seem to hold up well to pressure. Flashpoint, Metal, that kind of cover. Lots of vertical spine splits on brand new books, I have
Post 28 • IP   flag post
Collector thelastbard private msg quote post Address this user
Quote:
Originally Posted by shrewbeer
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelastbard
"squish" tactics


It should be noted that heavy cardstock covers from the last decade do not seem to hold up well to pressure. Flashpoint, Metal, that kind of cover. Lots of vertical spine splits on brand new books, I have


It gets hard to find decent ones from the time you get them from the store, but that could even be from handling. Spines look fine, but the staples are "punched" in from printing or handling... can't say for sure.
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COLLECTOR shrewbeer private msg quote post Address this user
My flashpoints are the worst. Full 1/4" splits in some places, on unread unmolested books. White color break from bottom to top of spine.

Metal just as an example; too new to tell what would happen to them, its just the same type of card paper.
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143275 44 30
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